Wolverhampton: Patrick Eagle

#TheList Patrick ‘Paddy’ Eagle, born 12/08/1998, of Deans Road, Wolverhampton – left his pony to suffer a horrific maggot-infested wound caused by a severely embedded headcollar

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.
Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony’s head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

Horse trader and backyard breeder of puppies and kittens Paddy Eagle pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to the two-year-old piebald colt.

A concerned member of the public contacted World Horse Welfare about a group of cobs kept near Walsall, West Midlands, and field officer Charlotte Melvin attended the site in October 2019.

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

A spokesman for the charity said Charlotte noticed a strong smell when she approached the last pony.

“On closer inspection Charlotte discovered the pony, now named Moses, had a severely embedded headcollar. The wound was very badly infected and full of maggots,” he said.

“Charlotte contacted the RSPCA, police, vets and a transporter. The pony was removed under the Animal Welfare Act and transported to the vets for urgent treatment.”

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

The spokesman said Moses remained at the vets for four days owing to the extent of his injury, after which he was taken to the charity’s Penny Farm Rescue and Rehoming Centre.

“Given how horrific the wound from his headcollar was, I’m really happy with the recovery Moses has made,” said Charlotte.

“Moses’ suffering could so easily have been prevented and it’s awful to think he could have been left like that if someone hadn’t cared enough to report the situation.”

“Thanks to the person who reported him, Moses is now happy and healthy and will be able to find a loving new home through our rehoming scheme,” said Charlotte.

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

In mitigation, the court heard gypsy traveller Eagle suffered from mental health issues which affected his ability to care for the pony.

Sentencing: 12-week suspended sentence; £400 costs; 60 hours of unpaid work. Banned from keeping equines for 10 years.

Horse and Hound
Blackpool Gazette

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