Tag Archives: tethering

Malton, North Yorkshire/Hunslet, Leeds: Michael Price and Shannon Hanrahan

#TheList Michael Patrick Price, born 07/05/1991, of 24 Lime Tree Avenue, Malton YO17 7BZ, and partner Shannon Hanrahan (aka Shannon Price) born 04/06/1993, of Kidacre Park travellers site, Kidacre Street, Leeds LS10 1BD – abandoned several animals at Appleby Horse Fair

Animals abandoned and mistreated by gypsies Michael Price and Shannon Hanrahan
Gypsies Michael Price and Shannon Hanrahan mistreated animals and birds in their care

RSPCA inspectors were alerted after a passer-by saw that a pony had been left tethered beside the A685 just outside of Kirkby Stephen while two dogs were running loose near to two empty kennels.

None of the animals were being supervised or looked after, and the pony had no access to drinking water. Another dog – found in a cage without bedding – had no clean drinking water.

RSPCA inspector Claire Little said: “On Friday 31st May, whilst on duty in Kirkby Stephen, Cumbria, my colleague and I received a request from the police to help with some animals.

“As we arrived at the location I saw a brindle lurcher-type dog and what appeared to be a collie-type dog amongst the traffic and the police were trying to catch them.

“We pulled over and I managed to secure the dogs and get them into our van for safekeeping whilst we approached the police officers.

“It was explained to us that the owners of the dogs were believed to be the occupants of a caravan on the side of the road and that they were in Bradford.

“The dogs were wearing collars but there was no tethering equipment of any kind and a small caged area measuring approximately 2 ft x 2 ft x 2 ft with no lid was the only possible living area I could see for them. There was no shelter available for the cage.

“The police were concerned regarding some birds in cages they had seen inside a van next to the caravan so my colleague went to look at those – they turned out to be wild goldfinches.

“I then saw a small cream Lhasa Apso-type dog that appeared young, inside a metal cage at the side of the road. The cage had a lid that was secured but there was no shelter and the dog was laying on wet grass with no access to water. As the weather was wet I was concerned about the dog as they appeared to be shivering.

“A grey shetland pony tethered with a length of blue nylon rope tied around their neck was nearby. The rope was so tight that I couldn’t get my finger between the rope and the neck and I was concerned that this may start to injure the pony if they remained in this situation. The rope was tied to a nearby branch of a hedge that was quite flimsy. The pony’s hooves appeared overgrown.

“The police took the three dogs and pony into possession and placed them in RSPCA care.”

Michael Patrick Price admitted not ensuring the needs of the pony were met, and the same charge for a lurcher dog and a collie cross.

He also admitted having two goldfinches.

His co-accused Shannon Hanrahan admitted failing to ensure the proper care of the caged dog, and illegally having the two goldfinches.

A deprivation order was placed on the pony and two dogs who will now pass into RSPCA care and be rehomed. The birds were released back into the wild.

Sentencing:
Price was given 60 hours of unpaid work and ordered to pay costs and charges totalling £690. He was banned from owning or keeping any animal for four years.

Hanrahan was given a 14-day curfew at an address in Byker, Newcastle. She must pay also £250 costs and a £32 victim surcharge.

News and Star
RSPCA News

South Shields, Tyne and Wear: Natasha and Cameron Bell

#TheList Natasha ‘Tasha’ Bell, born c. 1982, of Bonsall Court, South Shields NE34 0HT, and son Cameron Bell, born c. 2001, of Bamford Walk, South Shields NE34 0JA – for the neglect of two horses, one of which had to be euthanised

Horse abusers Natasha Bell and son Cameron Bell from South Shields, Tyne and Wear, UK
Natasha Bell and son Cameron Bell caused unnecessary suffering to two horses including this one

Mother and son Natasha and Cameron Bell admitted causing unnecessary suffering to horses Porky and Chalky and failing to meet their needs.

The animals were discovered tethered to trees in Boldon Colliery in January 2019.

Horse abusers Natasha Bell and son Cameron Bell from South Shields, Tyne and Wear, UK, pictured outside court
Horse abusers Cameron and Natasha Bell pictured outside court

Porky had collapsed and had to be put down because he was unable to recover.

Both ponies had a poor body condition and were found to have heavy worm burdens. It was said they could have been suffering for at least six months.

Horse abuser Cameron Bell from South Shields, Tyne and Wear, UK

RSPCA prosecutor Stewart Haywood told the court how the ponies had been inappropriately tethered, were not kept in a suitable environment and had “inadequate dietary provision”.

He said an RSPCA inspector arrived at some open public land in South Tyneside on January 24, 2019, after a report of a collapsed pony.

“This pony turned out to be Porky,” said Mr Haywood. “The inspector made attempts to stand it up. It was in a poor condition and tethered inappropriately to a tree that was on a slope.

“A vet came and further attempts were made for Porky to stand. However the only course was euthanasia.

“The police also attended and euthanasia was carried out.”

The prosecutor told the court that Chalky was found in the same area, also tethered and underweight.

Horse abuser Cameron Bell from South Shields, Tyne and Wear, UK

Further examination revealed that Porky was thin and had a worm infestation, and the animal had “lack of muscle and body strength”.

Meanwhile, Chalky’s tether had been too tight and the animal also had a high worm burden.

Mr Haywood added: “The ponies were suffering for several reasons. They had inadequate provision of water and a poor body condition.

“The environment was hazardous and there was a risk of injury. The tight tether of Chalky would have caused discomfort.

“This is a case of horses that were clearly suffering significantly.”

Solicitor Valerie Bell, representing both defendants, said the horses were owned by Cameron and his mum played a smaller role in their care.

She said Natasha Bell had suffered significant mental health problems for many years and was receiving medication. A psychiatric report explaining her background was prepared for the court.

It was said Natasha’s “mental health had deteriorated during the commission of these offences”.

Their lawyer added: “Both are genuinely remorseful and very distressed about the whole background that has led to this.”

Sentencing:
Natasha Bell – 12-month community order with rehabilitation activities, £60 fine plus costs.
Cameron Bell – 12-week prison sentence suspended for a year; 80 hours of unpaid work plus rehabilitation activity requirement; ordered to pay costs.
Both were banned from keeping horses for 10 years.

ChronicleLive

Sunderland: Glenn A Foot

#TheList Glenn Foot, born 05/11/1987, of 42 Marley Crescent, Sunderland SR5 5BL – left his horse to suffer with a maggot infested wound

Failing boxer Glenn Foot left his defenceless horse tethered and suffering an infected wound

The RSPCA found skewbald stallion Raspy tethered on land near Wembley Road in Sunderland. Owner Glenn Foot was called to the scene, but refused to answer questions.

Police were called to supervise Raspy’s removal, but before a trailer could be loaded, Foot put his 12-year-old nephew on Raspy’s back and fled the scene.

Stewart Haywood, prosecuting on behalf of the RSPCA, said tethering Raspy was against welfare guidelines.

“In cases that a horse can be tethered, a broad leather collar should be used with a 360 degree swivel,” said Mr Haywood.

“The horse should also not be tethered near rights of way – there was a public path nearby – and the horse should be inspected at least once every six hours.

“Raspy had two nylon collars, one of which had caused the wound which became infected.

“A vet estimated the wound to be between two and five days old, “There were maggots and fly larvae in the wound.

“The RSPCA say the horse was subject to a prolonged period of neglect.”

The court heard Raspy and Foot were traced for a second time following a press appeal. Raspy’s injuries had healed by then, and Foot was allowed to keep him.

One of life’s failures: Convicted horse abuser Glenn Foot isn’t much cop as a boxer either

Foot was convicted of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal, and f obstructing an RSPCA inspector in the execution of her duty, both on August 29, 2018.

Both convictions were in his absence after he failed to turn up for his trial.

Geoffrey Forrester, defending, said: “Mr Foot has dedicated much of his life to boxing.

“At the time of this offending he was preparing for a very important fight which would, had be won, led to great exposure and a remunerative contract with a promoter.

“He had been to a press conference to promote the fight on the day he was called to deal with Raspy.

“Unfortunately, the fight was lost, as were the associated opportunities.

“On the day he fled with the horse, he just panicked.

“The vet says the injuries to Raspy may have been only two days old. That is unpleasant, but it’s not a prolonged period of time.

“This is not a case of a man who leaves a horse to fend for itself for weeks or months at a time.”

Sentencing: 18-month community order; 300 hours of unpaid work; £455 costs. Banned from keeping equine animals for five years. The bench gave the RSPCA the power to seize Raspy if Foot still has him.

Sunderland Echo

Barlby, North Yorkshire: Keith Lewis

#TheList Keith Lewis, born c. 1948, of York Road, Barlby, North Yorkshire YO8 – a serial abuser with three separate convictions for neglect involving dozens of animals including dogs, rabbits, ferrets and birds

In December 2018 RSPCA officers discovered Lewis’s injured dog Meg tethered to a pipe with a chain inside a dark and muddy shed. She had an infected+- neck wound caused by embedded twine.

In the latest prosecution case against him serial abuser Keith Lewis admitted causing unnecessary suffering to a collie dog named Meg

The RSPCA attended Lewis’s property on 13 December 2018, along with police after a call from a member of the public and found Meg tethered to a pipe with a chain inside a dark and muddy shed.

RSPCA inspector Claire Mitchell said: “The chain and tether were absolutely filthy, caked in mud and faeces.

“You could see that whatever Meg had around her neck was really tight and there was an obvious smell of infection coming from her.

“On closer inspection it became clear that it was in fact bailer twine and she needed urgent veterinary attention.”

Meg was seized by police and taken to a vets who found the area around her neck was matted with pus.

The twine – which had been wrapped around her neck multiple times – was embedded in her skin and muscle and infected, and when the vet cut it off she found a wound all the way around her neck.

Meg’s temperature was high – most likely as a result of the infection – and her lower body was matted with dirt and faeces.

She was operated on to clip and clean the wound and stitch it up and hospitalised for five days.

Veterinary evidence suggested that Meg had suffered for at least two weeks.

Inspector Mitchell said: “This is the worst tethering injury I’ve ever seen in a dog. It was absolutely terrible and she suffered a great deal.

“The RSPCA does not agree with tethering dogs for long periods as it can cause distress and restrict natural behaviours but this in itself is not illegal providing that their needs are being met.”

Meg was signed over shortly afterward coming into RSPCA care and has been rehomed.

In mitigation the court heard that Lewis had pleaded guilty, that Meg had been moved to the shed following complaints about her continuously howling where she had been previously tethered near to a public footpath, that he had animals all his life and a disqualification would have a real impact on him.

However, the court remarked that he had previous animal cruelty convictions which were an aggravating factor.

Lewis was first prosecuted in 2016 when York magistrates heard how he kept 60 animals living in filthy, squalid and cramped conditions in former agricultural buildings in Barlby.

On that occasion he admitted neglect offences in relations to about 30 of the animals, mostly poultry and rabbits, and was banned from keeping caged animals for 10 years and ordered to do a 12-week curfew.

Three months after he appeared in court, police and an RSPCA inspector found two ferrets at his house in what the RSPCA’s prosecuting solicitor Phil Brown called “frankly appalling” conditions. They had no water, they were kept with piles of faeces and dirty bedding and three rotting rabbit carcasses.

Lewis was again taken to court and this time admitted breaching the 10-year animal ban, and failure to care for animals.

He received a second 10-year animal ban, preventing him having animals kept in cages.

But in December 2018, the RSPCA found Meg with the untreated wound round her neck.

At each of his three hearings, he claimed through his solicitors that the animals belonged to his son, claims that are not accepted by the RSPCA.

Sentencing (February 2019): 24-week prison sentence, suspended for two years; total of £415 costs and charges. Banned indefinitely from owning or having any part in the care of any animal of any species. A deprivation order was placed on any other animals in his care, including a number of dogs, cats, poultry, sheep, cows and pigs.

Yorkshire Post
York Press
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York Press

Lymington, New Forest, Hampshire: Jason Cooper

#TheList Jason Cooper, aged 43, of Pound Road, Pennington, Lymington SO41 8EJ –  convicted of ill-treating a horse whom he had left tethered with awful hooves and teeth and an untreated lice condition

Gypsy traveller and horse abuser Jason Cooper from Lymington, Hampshire
Gypsy traveller Jason Cooper has a previous conviction for theft and deception

Gypsy traveller Cooper, who has a previous conviction for theft and deception involving a 92yo pensioner who died shortly after, caused ‘necessary suffering’ to a piebald filly named Tippee.

Horse abuser and gypsy lowlife Jason Cooper from Lymington, New Forest
Sorry, ladies – he’s spoken for.

The RSPCA were called by a member of the public and, assisted by World Horse Welfare, rescued the horse from a piece of land at Admiralty Way in Marchwood, Southampton.

Tippee – who was given her name by her rescuers because of the way she wobbled when she walked – was found in an emaciated condition, covered in lice, and tethered in an unsuitable environment.

The horse was taken into possession by police.

RSPCA inspector Tina Ward, who investigated for the animal welfare charity, said: “Tippee was being kept in inappropriate conditions and her basic needs were not being met.

“She was in poor bodily condition, her hooves and teeth were in an awful state, and she had an untreated lice infestation.

“Cooper had been the owner of Tippee for just five weeks and had already been told to remove her from the common by the Agisters because of her poor bodily condition

“The standard of care fell well below that of a reasonable owner.

“Cooper had a lifetime of experience of owning and keeping horses and should have known no horse should have been left to suffer in the way Tippee had been.”

“All horses need daily care and attention and especially those that are tethered. The practice of tethering horses, whilst far from ideal, is not illegal in this country, so owners who choose to keep their horses this way must go the extra mile to ensure all the horse’s welfare needs are being met.

“I am grateful to all the organisations who were involved in this case and did all they could to help give Tippee the second chance she deserves.”

Tippee has since recovered and will soon be looking for a new home.

Sentencing:
£180 with £250 costs. Banned from owning, keeping and dealing in equine animals for two years. 

Daily Echo

Sunderland: Lian Wilson and Daniel Mark Jones

#TheList Lian Wilson, born 1974, and son Daniel Mark Jones, born c. 1997, both of Ramillies Road, Red House, Sunderland SR5 5JF – left their wounded pony chained on an allotment

Horse abusers Lian Wilson and son Daniel Mark Jones from Sunderland

RSPCA prosecutor Denise Jackman told the court how piebald stallion Milo was found on July 11, 2016, after concerns were raised for a horse at Downhill Allotments, in Sunderland.

Animal collection officers attended the scene and found Milo with a chain wrapped around his neck, with his head collar entangled in the chain. There was a large wound under the animal’s chin.

Abused pony Milo was found tethered by a rope to the ground. Now his owners Lian Wilson and Daniel Mark Jones of Sunderland have been banned from keeping horses.
Abused pony Milo was found tethered by a rope to the ground. Now his owners Lian Wilson and Daniel Mark Jones of Sunderland have been banned from keeping horses.

“The piebald pony was tethered to the ground by a chain and rope,” Mrs Jackman said.

“The tether had become embedded in the skin, behind the ears and top of the neck, and there was a large wound under its chin.”

The court heard a vet and the police were called and Milo was released with bolt cutters.

Jones then appeared by the field asking why they were taking his pony away. Mrs Jackman said Milo was taken away and for further veterinary examination.

She added: “It became immediately clear that the depth of the wounds were much greater than previously thought.”

Mrs Jackman said: “The vet was of the opinion that the pony has suffered unnecessarily.

On July 14, 2016, Wilson contacted the RSPCA and stated she was the joint owner of the pony, with her son.

The following day the pair were visited by the RSPCA and refused to sign the pony over to the charity.

“The horse has now, this morning, been signed over the the RSPCA,” Mrs Jackman said.

Wilson told the inspector she was unaware of wounds, while her son said he checked the horse in between his work shifts and that he changed the horse’s position in the tether every 10 days.

Mrs Jackman referred to guidance from Defra, which states that a tether should be be used only as a short-term measure, and should be used only while stopping during short journeys and under increased supervision.

The pair both admitted causing unnecessary suffering to Milo.

Bench chairman Peter De Vere said: “From the photographs we can clearly see that the horse was suffering but the rest of the horse looked well.

“This was for a short period of time.”

Sentencing:
Total fines and charges of £334.50 each. Banned from keeping horses and ponies for five years with the right to appeal after just one year.

Sunderland Echo