Tag Archives: Lancashire

Blackpool, Lancashire: Carl Dyson

#TheList Carl Anthony Dyson, born 03/04/1979, of 90 Belmont Avenue, Blackpool FY1 4BG – killed a cat by dropping a concrete slab onto her head to “put it out of its misery”

Cat killer Carl Dyson from Blackpool
Cat killer Carl Dyson’s actions were described in court as “inhuman”

Father-of-two Dyson admitted killing the female black and white long-haired cat, called Paddy, at an address on Salthouse Avenue, Blackpool, on October 23, 2019.

The court heard how Dyson had been seen by a neighbour carrying Paddy, wrapped in a pink towel, into his friend’s back garden, where he dropped a large concrete slab twice on the animal’s head.

The witness said they saw the cat trying to wriggle free before Dyson let go of the slab.

Paul Ridehalgh, prosecuting on behalf of the RSPCA, said the witness “saw Dyson drop a slab as thick as a laptop on the cat’s head as it lay in the yard”, and added: “She saw the cat try and escape from the blanket before Dyson did the same thing again.”

The neighbour alerted the RSPCA and inspectors found “a plethora” of traumatic injuries to Paddy’s head.

Mr Ridehalgh said: “The inspector observer a black and white plastic cat carrier that appeared to have blood on it. Inside he found the body of a black and white cat.

“The cat appeared to have suffered massive injuries to her head, as it was crushed on one side, with its eye bulging.

“The defendant said he believed the cat may have been hit by a car.”

Cat killer Carl Dyson from Blackpool

After telling Paddy’s owner, Anthony Johnson, what had happened, the cat’s body was taken away for further inspection.

Mr Ridehalgh said: “The cat had suffered traumatic injuries to its head. The conclusion was that these injuries were caused by forceful, violent compression of the cat’s head. The death could have been very quick.

“The cat could have been suffering from some cancerous lumps in the head area. Vets also examined the cat and found it to be in a poor condition, it was severely underweight with fleas jumping off her. The fur was matted and covered in faeces.

“The cat’s head had clearly been crushed. The vet’s opinion was that the cat’s injuries were unsurvivable. In her opinion, the cat’s death would have certainly caused suffering… the dropping of a concrete slab on a cat is not an acceptable method of euthanasia, and any reasonable person would have taken the cat to a vet.”

A veterinary examination found the cat had been suffering from a cancerous tumour in the mouth and was severely underweight.

When interviewed by the RSPCA, the defendant claimed he thought the cat had been injured in a road accident and he “panicked”.

Dyson’s lawyer Gary McAnulty of Fylde Law told the court his client “was suffering at the time with some mental health problems, anxiety and depression.”

Sentencing Dyson, magistrate Ed Beaman said: “The cat was trying to escape the blanket and was not so ill as to be accepting of its fate.

“There’s evidence that the cat was distressed while in the blanket prior to the first impact. We believe the cat was still alive prior to the second impact, and this caused distress to both the cat and the witnesses who saw the offence.”

Sentencing: 12 weeks in jail (released on bail after lodging an appeal). Ordered to pay a total of £200 coss and charges. Banned from owning, keeping or managing animals indefinitely.

Blackpool Gazette
Birmingham Mail

Heysham, Morecambe, Lancashire: Daniel Brockhill

#TheList Daniel Brockhill, born 21/02/1968, of 16 Robin Crescent, Heysham LA3 2WG – for cruelty to two ponies

Daniel Brockhill from Heysham and one of the two horses he neglected
One of Daniel Brockhill’s neglected horses was underweight, depressed and riddled with lice

Brockhill, a Romany gypsy and alleged backyard breeder of diseased Staffordshire bull terriers, admitted causing unnecessary suffering to two ponies

The first animal, a dark brown cob mare, was left with a ‘stinking open wound’ caused by the tight bridle rubbing her, as well as a small cut to her nose, and areas of fur missing on the face.

The second animal, a black and white piebald cob mare, was spotted wandering in the field “aimlessly” in a dull and depressed state.

The weak and malnourished pony was not very responsive and had an elevated heartbeat and temperature. She was riddled with lice and eggs that had been present for at least 10 days, and had fecal staining on her hind legs indicating serious diarrhea.

The court was told Brockhill had only bought this pony three weeks earlier.

Prosecuting, Paul Ridehalgh told the court that a worker from World Horse Welfare had attended a field in the Twemlow Parade area of Heysham where 13 horses were kept. Most were in good body condition, but one had a bridle that was “clearly too tight” around her nose.

Mr Ridehalgh described how the worker went to loosen the bridle and discovered “a red raw open wound” under the pony’s chin. The collar had become embedded within the hair and skin and a bad smell was emanating from the wound.

The charity worker alerted the RSPCA, and when another inspector attended they became concerned about the other horse who looked too thin.

Mr Ridehalgh added: “It was displaying extremely worrying behaviour and clearly was extremely unwell.

A veterinary surgeon who examined the animals concluded both had been caused suffering by Brockhill’s failure to act.

Despite her painful injury, the first horse was bright, alert and responsive But the second was scored just one out of five on her body condition – zero being emaciated.

Brockhill agreed to sign over both horses to the RSPCA.

The thin horse gained 8kg in the four weeks she boarded with the charity

Horse abuser Daniel Brockhill

During an interview, Brockhill admitted he owned both ponies but claimed he had only owned the malnourished one for three weeks.

He said he had when he arranged transport to a field in Skipton the horse was weak and could barely walk, and that he was “appalled” by her condition.

When it was pointed out that she should have been referred to a vet, Brockhill said he was experienced in keeping horses and it was his opinion the horse just needed a ‘good feed’.

The court heard Brockhill had a conviction for animal cruelty from 2002, but of dissimilar nature.

District Judge Paul Clarke said there had been a “high level of suffering”, but recognised Brockhill had co-operated with the RSPCA.

He remarked it wasn’t “deliberate cruelty”, adding: “It comes down to competence and horse husbandry.”

Sentencing: curfew; a total of £690 costs and charges. No ban.

The Visitor

Bacup, Lancashire: Eleanor Marsh and Amy Youll

#The List Eleanor (Ellie) Rose Marsh, born c. 1992, and Amy Elizabeth Youll, born 17/02/1992, both of Todmorden Road, Bacup OL3 – both pleaded guilty to not taking reasonable steps to ensure the needs of the eight dogs and three cats were met.

Convicted animal abusers Amy Youll and Ellie Marsh from Bacup, Lancashire, UK
Amy Youll (left) and partner Ellie Marsh failed to look after eight dogs and three cats and have now been banned from keeping animals for just 12 months.

Sentencing:
Both women were ordered to pay a total of £180 and banned from keeping animals for just 12 months.
Deprivation order on all of the animals.

LancsLive

Leyland, Lancashire: Inga Ozola and Arunas Venslovas

Prosecutions: Latvian nationals Inga Ozola, aged 43, and partner Arunas Venslovas, 50, both of 12 Seven Stars Road, Leyland PR25 1AL – charged with animal cruelty after a severely injured puppy is found buried alive in a field

Pictured is Pomeranian puppy who was found buried alive in a field.

Spencer, a nine-week-old Pomeranian puppy, had suffered two fractured limbs before he was buried, and later had to be put to sleep, Preston Magistrates’ Court was told.

Inga Ozola denies causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal between April 24 and 27, 2019, by burying the animal while he was still alive.

Ozola and her partner, Arunas Venslovas both deny failing to ensure Spencer received appropriate veterinary care for his injuries.

The trial of the Latvian couple, who were assisted by interpreters throughout the proceedings, was due to start on Thursday 23 January 2020, but Venslovas applied to delay the case as he had attended without representation.

He has since obtained legal aid but further arrangements need to be made.

Prosecuting on behalf of the RSPCA, Carmel Wilde accepted it was potentially an imprisonable matter, but indicated he should have done something about it sooner.

However the bench agreed to the adjournment and the case will now take place on April 27 and 28, 2020. A case management hearing will take place on February 25, 2020.

The case comes after a dog walker’s pets had sniffed out a mound of disturbed earth in the middle of a field off Shaw Brook Road, behind Worden Park, and discovered Spencer’s head poking out.

He had a broken front leg and a broken rear leg and was unable to walk or move.
(proceeding)

Lancashire Post

Fleetwood, Lancashire: Jack Starkey

#TheList badger digger/baiter and bloodsports fanatic Jack Starkey, born 12/10/1990, of Bold Street, Fleetwood FY7

Badger baiter Jack Starkey from Fleetwood, Lancashire, UK

Father-of-two Jack Starkey admitted two offences under the Protection of Badgers Act and one under the Animal Welfare Act.
He was due to stand trial for a number of offences under both Acts but pleaded guilty before the trial was set to commence.

Starkey was caught badger baiting in Bluebell Wood in Denton, Greater Manchester on January 3, 2019.

Two dog walkers came across Starkey and three other men digging a badger out of its sett. The men then let a dog attack it.

The walkers called police and a local animal welfare group, who found the badly injured badger.

The badger that was attacked by Jack Starkey's dog
The badger that was attacked by Jack Starkey’s dog

Sadly, the badger’s injuries were so serious he couldn’t be saved.

The following day, Chris Heyworth, an officer from the Special Operations Unit – a team of specialist officers tasked with investigating serious and organised animal crime such as animal fighting and wildlife offences – was contacted by Lancashire Badger Group who had been made aware of the incident.

Inspector Heyworth went to the scene, which was located just 70 yards from a road.

He said: “Unfortunately I’ve seen many disturbed badger setts and examples of badger digging in my 28 years as an RSPCA officer and it was clear this sett had been recently dug.

“In badger digging, a terrier is typically sent into the sett wearing a tracking collar and will corner the badger so the people above ground can dig them out.

“A large hole is dug – commonly referred to as a crowning point – and the badger is pulled out often by a large bull lurcher type dog.

“A seriously injured badger was discovered at the scene the previous day and taken to a vet but, sadly, had to be put to sleep due to the severity of the wounds.”

Information led to a suspect and the RSPCA approached Lancashire Police for assistance executing a warrant on February 12, 2019, at an address in Hodder Avenue, Fleetwood. Three dogs were found inside, two with extensive scarring and one with an open sore on his leg.

Badger baiter Jack Starkey from Fleetwood, Lancashire, UK

Occupants at the address said the dogs belonged to Starkey and he was contacted for interview.

Inspector Heyworth added: “We took DNA swabs from the badger’s wounds and these were later compared with DNA taken from the three dogs seized from Mr Starkey.

“Two were ruled out but results showed that a rare type of DNA – found in only one in 100 dogs – which was found on the badger was also present in the third dog.”

Badger baiter Jack Starkey from Fleetwood, Lancashire, UK

Starkey was charged with offences of attempting to kill a badger, digging a sett and causing suffering to one of the dogs in his care.

Starkey, who has links with the travelling community, eventually pleaded guilty to the charges against him.

The dogs remain in RSPCA care and will now be rehomed.

Inspector Heyworth added: “I’d like to thank Lancashire Police, Lancashire Badger Group, High Peak Badger Group and Science & Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA) for their assistance.

“It will send out a message to those who continue to persecute badgers within the county and further afield.”

Sentencing: 16-week suspended jail term; 100 hours of unpaid work and 20 hours of rehabilitation activity. Ordered to pay £1,115 costs. Banned from keeping dogs for eight years.

Blackpool Gazette
Lancashire Telegraph

Blackpool, Lancashire: Simon Broscombe

#TheList Simon L Broscombe, born 11/10/1984, of Bela Grove, Blackpool FY1 – had his dog’s ears cruelly and illegally mutilated.

Dog abuser Simon Broscombe from Blackpool, Lancashire, UK< arranged for his American bulldog's ears to be mutilated to look more intimidating
Simon Broscombe arranged for his American bulldog’s ears to be mutilated to look more intimidating

Wannabe hardman Simon Broscombe had his six-month-old American bulldog’s floppy ears cut back to short points so that the animal would look more intimidating.

Broscombe, who is apparently a hairdresser by profession, paid £2,000 for the puppy, known as Tyson, who came into the country from Holland.

He bought the dog, described as his pride and joy, a £3,000 gold neck collar.

In the first case of its type in the UK the RSPCA prosecuted Broscombe over the ear cropping.

Simon Broscombe had his dog Tyson's ears mutilated to make the animal look more intimidating
Cruelty victim Tyson and his mutilated ears

Broscombe admitted causing unnecessary suffering to the champagne-coloured dog by having his ears cropped.

He also admitted permitting another person to carry out a prohibited procedure on Tyson.

Dog abuser Simon Broscombe from Blackpool, Lancashire, UK< arranged for his American bulldog's ears to be mutilated to look more intimidating

Broscombe admitted a third charge of failing to protect Tyson from pain and suffering.

District Judge Jane Goodwin heard that dogs’ears can only be cropped for medical reasons and the cutting done by a qualified vet.

The procedure can cause pain to the animal involved and in Tyson’s case, an examination of his ears revealed scarring and holes.

He was in otherwise good condition.

The ears are a very sensitive organ of dogs but some owners have the dog’s natural ears cut back almost to the skull for purely cosmetic reasons designed to give breeds like the Bully a “street cred “look.

When Broscombe was confronted by RSPCA officer Amy McIntosh at his home, she says he grabbed his phone and she believed she was trying to delete Whatsapp pictures from it.

However, the investigators did trace messages from Broscombe one stating….”With big floppy ears.He not the kind of dog I want.”

RSPCA prosecutor Paul Ridehalgh told the court:”This dog is a cross between an American pit bull and American staffie.”

“The investigators found pictures of Tyson with his ears intact and the defendant knew that ear cropping in the UK is illegal.”

“Owners want cropped ears because it makes the animal more intimidating”

“These ears were mutilated and he would not say who did it which obstructed the RSPCA investigating.”

Dog abuser Simon Broscombe from Blackpool

Probation officer Amanda Kenyon said that Broscombe-who has facial tattoos- was devastated to have been split up from Tyson, who is being kept in kennels by the RSPCA.

Trevor Colebourne, defending, told the judge:”My client bought the dog via a breeder thinking it had had his ears cropped in Holland before being brought into the UK.”

“He would not name the person who carried out the procedure as he had been given a threat to keep his mouth shut and not be a grass.”

Sentencing Broscombe the judge told him: ”Despite your claim to be a responsible animal lover you became involved in a seedy operation which was a deliberate attempt to cause suffering.”

“You will not name the vet you claim was involved and this dog will have suffered for up to five days.

Sentencing: 12-week jail term suspended for 18 months. Ordered to do 200 hours of unpaid work and to pay £715 court costs. Banned from keeping any animal for seven years.

Wave965

Morecambe, Lancashire: Kilmany O’Connor

#TheList hoarder/breeder Kilmany Jane O’Connor (aka Kim O’Connor), born c. 1962, of Morecambe in Lancashire – banned from keeping animals for life after 54 dogs were found locked in tiny filthy cages at her home

Kilmany O'Connor of Morecambe, Lancashire, UK, has been banned from keeping animals for life after a raid on her home found 54 dogs stacked in small filthy cages

Kilmany O’Connor pleaded guilty to five offences under the Animal Welfare Act – four of causing unnecessary suffering to 36 of her 54 dogs, and one of failing to meet all 54 dogs’ needs.

O’Connor’s home was raided by the RSPCA and police officers, after concerns were raised about the welfare of a number of dogs at the address.

Kilmany O'Connor of Morecambe, Lancashire, UK, has been banned from keeping animals for life after a raid on her home found 54 dogs stacked in small filthy cages
Kilmany O’Connor has been banned from keeping animals for life after a raid on her home found 54 dogs stacked in small filthy cages

RSPCA Inspector Sam Morris described the scene.

The first thing that struck me when I walked through the front door was how cluttered the hallway was, with household items everywhere. There were three cages stacked on top of another, and each had a cockerpoo or cocker spaniel-type dog inside. The cages were filthy, and the dogs’ fur was badly matted with faeces.

All the cages within the property appeared to be similar in size, which measured approximately 50cm high, 44cm wide and 60cm in length – the dogs were barely able to turn around and lie down, stretch out or stand on their hind limbs and of course they couldn’t escape.

The situation got worse in the living room. It was very cluttered and filthy, and the smell inside was awful. The ammonia was overpowering. The curtains were drawn and thick with cobwebs. The windows were closed and the room was quite dark. This room contained 13 dogs in cages – two of the cages had two dogs inside. One dog was tethered to a table leg and there were five loose dogs.

Two more dogs were caged in the kitchen. Two dogs were caged in the utility room and 14 were loose. Another 14 dogs were caged in an upstairs bedroom, which was very humid.

Some of the dogs had obvious veterinary issues. None of the dogs in the property had access to water.

The dogs were all signed over at the scene and taken into RSPCA care. One of the dogs – Mindy – lost one of her front paws as a result of her neglect and another of the dogs – Fifi, who was tethered in the living room – now uses wheels to get around after having lost the use of her back legs, but all have been happily re-homed.

Sentencing: 16-week custodial sentence suspended for two years. Ordered to pay court costs. Lifetime ban on keeping animals.

Lancashire Post
ITV News

Blackburn, Lancashire: Scott Hibbert

#TheList Scott Anthony Hibbert, born c. 1997, of Redlam, Blackburn BB2 – launched a brutal attack on his own dog after she had been placed in a cage in the back of a police van.

Career criminal and drug abuser Scott Hibbert from Blackburn battered his dog in the back of a police van
Loser: violent thug Scott Hibbert from Blackburn can now add animal cruelty to his long list of criminal convictions

Blackburn magistrates heard lifelong violent thug and drug addict Hibbert repeatedly kicked and punched the dog – a Staffordshire bull terrier – before swinging her by the metal chain around her neck.

He then got hold of the dog with both hands and throttled her.

The court was told a female officer who witnessed the attack said it was the most “horrific” behaviour she could imagine towards an animal.

Hibbert, who despite his young age has multiple previous convictions for violence and intimidation, pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal and two charges of criminal damage to cars.

Tracy Yates, prosecuting, said the incident started at 8.30am on May 19 at an address in New Wellington Street, Blackburn.

Witnesses saw Hibbert leave the address and kick two cars. He was also seen to punch his dog before the police arrived.

“A witness said he was clearly heavily under the influence of something,” said Mrs Yates. “He was covered in blood and was placed in the back of the van with the dog. She said he was screaming in the dog’s face and she then witnessed the most horrific behaviour she could imagine.”

Mrs Yates said Hibbert punched the dog in the side, kicked it repeatedly and then swung it round by the chain.

“Just when she thought it couldn’t get any worse he picked the dog up by the throat and started to throttle it,” said Mrs Yates. “By this stage the dog, which had been agitated, was completely silent.”

The dog was eventually removed from the van.

“The officer said she had never seen such an aggressive act towards an animal in her career,” said Mrs Yates. “She said if that was how he behaved in public she couldn’t imagine how the dog was treated behind closed doors.”

Career criminal and drug abuser Scott Hibbert from Blackburn battered his dog in the back of a police van

When he was interviewed about the incident Hibbert said the officers were lying and he would never lay a finger on the dog. When the witness statements were read to him he told the officers to shut up.

Jonathan Taylor, defending, said his client clearly had problems and could benefit from the assistance of the probation service. He said Hibbert had been drinking all night and had fallen out with his brother. As he left the house he kicked out at the cars in frustration.

“He has always tried to look after the dog as best he can,” said Mr Taylor. “It is a highly strung animal and matters were not helped when its owner was irate. What is certain is that it should never have been placed in the back of the police van with him.”

He said Hibbert was deeply ashamed of what happened next.

“He doesn’t have a clear recollection of the matter but he is deeply apologetic,” said Mr Taylor.

Sentencing: 12-month community order with 40 days of rehabilitation activity. Curfew. Total of £285 compensation and charges. Banned from keeping animals for three years.

Lancashire Evening Post

Bradford Halal Slaughterhouse Cruelty: Dale Valley Rossendale Ltd and Employees

#TheList for cruelty to sheep at a halal abattoir – Dale Valley Rossendale Ltd (Malik Foods), Malik Halls, 47 Great Horton Road, Bradford BD7 1AZ (director Junaid Imtiaz Malik, born April 1979 and recent ex-director and previous offender Stephen Lee Riley, born July 1980, of Dunnockshaw Farm, Burnley BB11 5PP), employees Imdad Ali of 31 Park Road, Accrington BB4 1SU, Joseph Bell of Carr Bank Farm, Crawshawbooth, Rossendale BB4 8UE, David Hargreaves of Adelaide Street, Crawshawbooth, and Elizabeth Bennett of 26 Humber Street, Preston PR3 3WD

Faces of cruelty: director of Dale Valley Rossendale Ltd Junaid Malik and three of the four employees prosecuted for animal abuse

The brutal treatment of sheep at a halal non-stun abattoir was caught on covert CCTV installed by animal welfare charity, Animal Aid.

Blackburn magistrates heard how it showed animals having their throats hacked at repeatedly by a slaughterman responsible for ‘sticking’ them.

Animals were not correctly restrained or loaded during the slaughter process causing greater distress.

The court was told when the overseeing vet was present all procedures were carried out correctly.

Howard Shaw, prosecuting, said: “It is not that they were ignorant of the regulations, these were deliberate breaches.”

Abattoir operator Dale Valley Rossendale Limited pleaded guilty to eight offences under Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing Regulations for England and was fined £5,000 plus £2,000 costs.

Imdad Ali, aged 47, pleaded guilty to failing to ensure sheep were not moved, shacked or hoisted after they had been stuck and before it was unconscious, failing to ensure a sheep was killed by severance of its carotid arteries and jugular veins by rapid, uninterrupted movements of a knife, excessive flexing of the neck of a sheep during sticking, failing to ensure sheep were moved with care, and sticking a sheep while it was not properly restrained causing it to fall to the floor while being bled.

He was sentenced to eight weeks’ imprisonment, suspended for 18 months, ordered to do 200 hours of unpaid work and pay £200 costs and an £85 victim surcharge.

Joseph Bell and girlfriend Elizabeth Bennett were both prosecuted for their part in the cruelty at the Dunnockshaw Farm halal slaughterhouse
Joseph Bell and girlfriend Elizabeth Bennett were both prosecuted for their part in the cruelty at the Dunnockshaw Farm halal slaughterhouse

Joseph ‘Joe’ Bell, born 09/06/96, pleaded guilty to four charges relating to the improper handling of the sheep prior to slaughter. He was given a community order for 12 months with 120 hours’ unpaid work and ordered to pay £150 costs and an £85 victim surcharge.

David Hargreaves, 35, pleaded guilty to failing to ensure that every animal was moved with care by lifting ten sheep by their fleeces and/or tails when loading them into restrainers. He was fined £200 and ordered to pay £130 costs.

Joseph Bell and girlfriend Elizabeth Bennett were both prosecuted for their part in the cruelty at the Dunnockshaw Farm halal slaughterhouse

Elizabeth ‘Liz’ Bennett, 21, pleaded guilty to offences under the Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing Regulations. She was fined £120 and ordered to pay £100 costs.

Mr Shaw said the prosecution case was that a large number of sheep were caused to suffer unnecessarily during slaughter operations at the Dunnockshaw Farm abattoir on two days in March 2017.

Animal Aid commissioned two freelance investigators to install covert cameras in the killing room.

The investigators secretly entered the premises at night and installed the cameras which eventually provided the evidence on which the Foods Standards Agency based the prosecution.

Mr Shaw said over two days of filming 94 per cent of the sheep killed by non-stun halal methods were not slaughtered in compliance with the welfare requirements.

He said sheep were thrown into restraints and roughly handled prior to slaughter.

Ali failed to carry out the slaughter in the approved manner – a single rapid cut – and animals were moved after the cut before they had lost consciousness.

A Food Standards Agency spokesperson said: “The Food Standards Agency takes animal welfare at slaughterhouses very seriously and we investigate all reported breaches. We welcome that the business and individuals have been convicted and sentenced for their actions.

“Where abattoirs fail to uphold animal welfare standards, the FSA will investigate and seek to have prosecutions brought against those responsible.”

An Animal Aid spokeswoman said:‘While it is positive that this long-running case has finally concluded, we certainly do not feel that justice has been adequately served. These lenient sentences in no way reflect the gravity of the terrible suffering that was inflicted on gentle animals at the most vulnerable time of their short lives.

“It is important to emphasise the shocking scenes we filmed at this slaughterhouse were by no means unique. We have filmed inside 15 slaughterhouses, and found law-breaking in almost every case. Incidents filmed at other slaughterhouses include animals being beaten, kicked and burnt with cigarettes.

“But even when the law is followed to the letter, slaughter can never be cruelty-free. Slaughterhouses are merciless places, where animals’ lives are brutally taken from them.

“We would urge anyone who is shocked by this case to try a cruelty-free diet. Going vegan is the single best thing we can all do to help animals.”

Lancashire Telegraph
Lancs Live
Animal Aid

Background:
Animal Aid investigation
Britain’s Failing Slaughterhouses published by Animal Aid

Preston, Lancashire: Bradley Tomes

#TheList unlicensed animal trader Bradley Michael Tomes, born 27/04/1995, of Moss Lane, Hesketh Bank, Preston PR4 – kept dozens of exotic animals in filthy conditions and with untreated injuries

Some of the animals rescued from Bradley Tomes of Preston, Lancashire

Tomes pleaded guilty to 15 offences under the Animal Welfare Act after dozens of neglected exotic animals had to be rescued by the RSPCA.

The offences relate to six iguanas; two mara (large rodents from South America); 16 peafowl; two pelicans; three agouti (a rodent native to America and South America); five porcupines; one green parakeet; two jardine parrots; one golden pheasant; one green winged macaw; one white necked raven and one cape parrot.

In January 2019 the RSPCA were called by police to a farm on Taylors Meanygate in Tarleton and found the animals being kept in squalid and unsuitable conditions. The charity then attended a second address on Moss Lane, Tarleton where a shed-type building at the back of the premises contained a number of animals.

RSPCA Deputy Chief Inspector Alison Fletcher said: “Some of these animals were species we as RSPCA inspectors of many years’ experience had never dealt with before, and it was a shock to see them kept in such conditions.

“Both locations were filthy. Many of the animals were in accommodation that was obviously completely unsuitable, did not have access to food or water, or were suffering.

“At the farm, we found two mara inside a small plastic transportation crate on the floor of one of the make-shift buildings. Mara are a large rodent who stand up on their hind legs. The height of the crate was 300mm, or just 12 inches. The depth of the crate was 560mm, and the length was 870mm giving no real room for them to move around.

“A squalid enclosure at the same location housed three agoutis, two pelican and 13 peafowl (pictured above).

“Four porcupines (pictured right) were in a pen which was wet and muddy with just a small structure for shelter – temperatures on site were close to freezing with snow and driving rain.

“At the second address a macaw was found in a black crate, similar to a dog crate. The bird’s tail feathers were touching the sides of the crate.

“The iguanas were at this location too – all six of which were in poor body condition and four had injuries to their tails.”

Two animals, an Agouti and a Mara, have subsequently died, and the court heard further dead birds and animals were discovered at the same locations but are not subject to charges, as the cause of death cannot be established.

In mitigation the court heard that Tomes had an interest in animals all of his life and had been employed as a zoo keeper.

He had signed all of the animals over in February and pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity. He had gone through a difficult break up but had now turned his life around and had a new job and new relationship.

The surviving animals have been rehomed to specialist keepers.

Sentencing: 20 weeks in prison suspended for 12 months; 25 rehabilitation days; 120 hours of community service; total of £615 costs and charges. Disqualified from keeping all animals for five years with no appeal for two years.

Lancashire Post
RSPCA News