Tag Archives: appeal pending

Blackpool, Lancashire: Carl Dyson

#TheList Carl Anthony Dyson, born 03/04/1979, of 90 Belmont Avenue, Blackpool FY1 4BG – killed a cat by dropping a concrete slab onto her head to “put it out of its misery”

Cat killer Carl Dyson from Blackpool
Cat killer Carl Dyson’s actions were described in court as “inhuman”

Father-of-two Dyson admitted killing the female black and white long-haired cat, called Paddy, at an address on Salthouse Avenue, Blackpool, on October 23, 2019.

The court heard how Dyson had been seen by a neighbour carrying Paddy, wrapped in a pink towel, into his friend’s back garden, where he dropped a large concrete slab twice on the animal’s head.

The witness said they saw the cat trying to wriggle free before Dyson let go of the slab.

Paul Ridehalgh, prosecuting on behalf of the RSPCA, said the witness “saw Dyson drop a slab as thick as a laptop on the cat’s head as it lay in the yard”, and added: “She saw the cat try and escape from the blanket before Dyson did the same thing again.”

The neighbour alerted the RSPCA and inspectors found “a plethora” of traumatic injuries to Paddy’s head.

Mr Ridehalgh said: “The inspector observer a black and white plastic cat carrier that appeared to have blood on it. Inside he found the body of a black and white cat.

“The cat appeared to have suffered massive injuries to her head, as it was crushed on one side, with its eye bulging.

“The defendant said he believed the cat may have been hit by a car.”

Cat killer Carl Dyson from Blackpool

After telling Paddy’s owner, Anthony Johnson, what had happened, the cat’s body was taken away for further inspection.

Mr Ridehalgh said: “The cat had suffered traumatic injuries to its head. The conclusion was that these injuries were caused by forceful, violent compression of the cat’s head. The death could have been very quick.

“The cat could have been suffering from some cancerous lumps in the head area. Vets also examined the cat and found it to be in a poor condition, it was severely underweight with fleas jumping off her. The fur was matted and covered in faeces.

“The cat’s head had clearly been crushed. The vet’s opinion was that the cat’s injuries were unsurvivable. In her opinion, the cat’s death would have certainly caused suffering… the dropping of a concrete slab on a cat is not an acceptable method of euthanasia, and any reasonable person would have taken the cat to a vet.”

A veterinary examination found the cat had been suffering from a cancerous tumour in the mouth and was severely underweight.

When interviewed by the RSPCA, the defendant claimed he thought the cat had been injured in a road accident and he “panicked”.

Dyson’s lawyer Gary McAnulty of Fylde Law told the court his client “was suffering at the time with some mental health problems, anxiety and depression.”

Sentencing Dyson, magistrate Ed Beaman said: “The cat was trying to escape the blanket and was not so ill as to be accepting of its fate.

“There’s evidence that the cat was distressed while in the blanket prior to the first impact. We believe the cat was still alive prior to the second impact, and this caused distress to both the cat and the witnesses who saw the offence.”

Sentencing: 12 weeks in jail (released on bail after lodging an appeal). Ordered to pay a total of £200 coss and charges. Banned from owning, keeping or managing animals indefinitely.

Blackpool Gazette
Birmingham Mail

Olveston, Bristol: Susan Smith, Mark Downes, Georgina Blizzard Smith

#TheList Sue Smith and daughter Georgina ‘Gina Louise’ Blizzard Smith, both of Ingst Manor Farm, Ingst Hill, Olveston, Bristol BS35 4AP and Smith’s employee Mark Downes of Pilning, Bristol  – convicted of a catalogue of shocking offences of animal welfare involving horses, cattle, goats,  pigs, chickens and dogs.

Farmer Sue Smith and daughter Georgina Blizzard-Smith both of Ingst Manor Far, Olveston, Bristol and some of the scenes of horror that met the RSPCA
Farmer Sue Smith and daughter Georgina Blizzard-Smith both of Ingst Manor Farm, Olveston, Bristol and some of the scenes of horror that the RSPCA were confronted with

The RSPCA said the scenes they discovered at Ingst Manor Farm will ‘stick in the minds’ of all the inspectors who found hundreds of dead and dying animals at the farm, with dead horses, pigs, sheep, chickens and cattle lying around, being eaten by other animals.

The carcasses of 87 dead sheep were found, nine cattle, two pigs, two goats and there were so many dead chickens and poultry that the RSPCA could not count them all,

The animals that were still alive were waist-deep in faeces and decomposing bodies.

A decomposing horse was found wrapped in plastic, with another dead horse discovered attached to the rear of a vehicle with a rope tied around its neck.

Officers saw thin horses walking through thick, deep mud that was up to their knees in some places, surrounded by scrap metal, barbed wire, broken fencing and a bonfire containing animal bones.

Further horror awaited the inspectors in a muddy barn. It was filled with sick and starving sheep, cows and pigs, who were all trying to survive living on top of the piles of dead animals.

In one heartbreaking scene, those going into the farm found lambs alive, lying on the bodies of their mothers, mud six inches deep covering the decaying bodies of other animals, and goats that had starved to death.

The inspectors had to undertake a disposal operation of animal carcasses on a scale not seen since the Foot and Mouth crisis 17 years ago.

RSPCA inspectors visited the farm in March 2015 after concerns were raised and on arrival were met with scenes of appalling suffering.

On further visits to the farm, RSPCA inspectors also found more animals in need of help.

There were piles of carcasses throughout the barn amongst the live sheep and dogs kept in small, faeces-filled cages without food or water. They carried out numerous initial visits throughout that summer of 2015 to clear the dead animals and rescue the survivors.

When they returned in April 2016 to check up, they discovered instead of things getting better over the winter, they had got worse.

They found a number of pigs eating a dead sheep, with other pigs in a pig pen eating a dead pig.

Susan Smith (b. circa 1958) was found guilty of a total of 36 individual charges. She was convicted of ten separate charges relating to not disposing of the bodies of dead animals properly, and another 26 ranging from animal cruelty and neglect through to not registering births or using unlicensed feed.

Smith’s employee Mark Downs, (b. circa 1968), from Blands Row in nearby Pilning, was convicted of 22 separate charges relating to animal cruelty, neglect and failure to dispose of bodies.

Smith’s daughter Georgina Blizzard-Smith (born 20/12/1996) was found guilty of two offences relating to two dogs at the farm in April 2016. was also found guilty of two charges of failing to take steps to ensure the needs of two dogs, Angel a golden Labrador, and Savannah, a Border Collie, and causing unnecessary suffering to the collie.

Sentencing:

Sue Smith (August 2018): not concluded pending the outcome of an appeal

Georgina Blizzard-Smith (June 2018): deprived of ownership;  £500 in costs and £306 in compensation.

Mark Downes:  32 weeks in prison; £1,000 in costs; banned from keeping farm animals – pigs, sheep, goats, horses and cattle – for life.

Newslinks:
Bristol Live 14/6/18
Bristol Live 21/6/18
Bristol Live 23/8/18

In 2002 Sue Smith was banned from keeping horses for life alongside then partner and father to her offspring, Brian Blizzard.

Recent photograph of horse killer Brian Blizzard, who still lives in Bristol
Recent photograph of horse killer Brian Blizzard, who still lives in Bristol

The pair had pleaded guilty to three counts of causing unnecessary suffering.

The court heard that RSPCA inspectors first visited Ingst Manor Farm in February 2001.

RSPCA officers described the conditions of the fields at the farm as: “similar to a rice paddy.”

The court was also played video evidence, which was described by the judge as “horrific”. It showed several dead horses lying in muddy fields with waterlogged ditches.

A chestnut mare was found dead in the field, covered in plastic bags. A post mortem revealed she had died of multiple bone fractures, weakened by starvation.

A foal, which later died, was found collapsed and so emaciated that its bones stuck out.

The defence told the court that Smith thought the animals had died after being given food containing ragwort.

Horse & Hound

Update November 2019: Susan Smith was jailed for 18 months after being convicted of the following charges:

  • Ten charges of failing to comply with animal by-product requirement
  • Two charges of failing to register an animal for cattle identification
  • Failing to produce a cattle passport
  • Failing to make available to an inspector an animal welfare record
  • Sourcing animal feed from unregistered premises
  • Contravening an order of the Minister of State
  • Five charges of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal
  • Six charges of failing to ensure animal welfare

She denied all but two of the charges.

Judge Euan Ambrose told Smith: “You showed a stubborn intransigence with which you have contested every single aspect of every single charge.”

Smith, who bowed her head for much of the sentence, was banned from keeping all animals for life.

South Gloucestershire Council and the RSPCA are seeking £50,806.61 and £389,911.33 in costs respectively, and that application will be considered by the judge after consideration of written submissions from the defence and prosecution.

Bristol Post

Salford, Greater Manchester: Jamie Lee Wilson, Chelsey Clayton and Dean Smedley

#TheList for beating a helpless dog Chelsey Alice Clayton (DoB 22.03.93) of Memorial Road, Walkden M28, Jamie Lee Wilson (DoB 24.08.94) of 13 Birch Road, Walkden M28 7FE, and the dog’s owner  Dean Mark Anthony Smedley (DoB 01.08.92) of Flat 12 Willow Tree Court, Eccles M30 8PS

A twisted trio of animal abusers from Manchester
A twisted trio of animal abusers from Manchester

Neighbours filmed Jamie Lee Wilson repeatedly punching a Staffy named Bob (pictured) as the dog yelped out in pain in the back yard of a house occupied by Wilson’s partner, Chelsey Clayton. Clayton was also filmed attacking the dog.

Bob the Staffy beaten by Chelsey Clayton and Jamie Lee Wilson

The RSPCA began investigating when several neighbours tipped them off regarding dogs being potentially beaten at Clayton’s property on Memorial Road in Walkden.

An RSPCA inspector went round and viewed the footage, shown to a district judge in Manchester magistrates’ court, which captured first Clayton hitting a dog in the back yard of her property.

Remorseless: convicted dog abuser Chelsey Clayton pictured outside court
Remorseless: convicted dog abuser Chelsey Clayton pictured outside court

That was followed by a ‘prolonged’ attack by Wilson who, despite the animal being obscured for some it, can be seen grabbing and throwing him around and raising his fists and punching him.

Bob’s ordeal lasted well over a minute and the dog was ‘screaming, crying and clearly in distress’, said Anna McDonald, prosecuting for the RSPCA.

At the end of the footage, Wilson was seen holding up the dog and punching it to the head.

An RSPCA inspector attended with police officers following the incident, on 17 August 2017, and seized all the animals at the property for their protection.

Bob was examined, and had a laceration to his lip but no other injuries and no treatment was required.

However, a vet confirmed any animal which has been beaten, causing it to cry as heard on the video, will have been caused to suffer unnecessarily.

Wilson and Clayton were both charged with causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal.

The charges were proved in the pair’s absence at a hearing in February 2018.

Dean Smedley, who was Bob’s owner, was at the property at the time of the attack and ‘failed to do anything to prevent Bob from being beaten and suffering unnecessarily’, the prosecution said.

Bob's useless owner Dean Smedley did nothing to stop his dog from being beaten by Clayton and Wilson
Bob’s useless owner Dean Smedley did nothing to stop his dog from being beaten by Clayton and Wilson

He was convicted of two offences of failing to take steps to prevent physical violence to a protected animal.

Speaking after the case, RSPCA Inspector Vicky MacDonald said: “This was a really shocking case which is reflected by the sentences handed down.

“I’m really grateful to the witnesses who came forward to take a stand against this kind of behaviour who, in doing so, enabled us to conduct this investigation, and to the police for the help that I received from them throughout.”

Sentencing: 

Wilson: jailed for 14 weeks and banned from keeping animals for 10 years (expires June 2028). His legal team lodged an appeal against his sentence.

Clayton: eight-week sentence, suspended for a year, £200 costs. Disqualified from keeping animals for eight years (expires June 2026).

Smedley (sentenced in May 2018): 18-week prison sentence, suspended for two years. 150 hours of unpaid work. Disqualified from keeping animals for seven years (expires May 2025).

Daily Mail
Manchester Evening News