Tag Archives: acute suffering

Aston, Birmingham: Robert Iordan, Florin Nutu and Viorel Manu

#TheList Robert Iordan, born 28/05/1996, Florin Nutu, born 11/01/1984, and Viorel Manu, born c. 1980, all of 41 Dunsink Road, Birmingham B6 6PL – killed and butchered around 350 sheep in Northamptonshire over four months.

Police mugshots of Robert Iordan and Florin Nutu

Between June 22 and October 7, 2019, the three Romanian nationals travelled across rural areas in the county, killing and butchering sheep in order to steal the meat and profit from it.

The trio’s attacks on sheep and lambs, which all took place in the dead of night, had the county’s livestock farming community gripped in fear.

But they were hunted down by Northamptonshire Police’s rural crime team, acting on key information from NFU members and farmers, and arrested.

All three eventually pleaded guilty and were sentenced at Northampton crown court.

In a hearing in October 2019, the court heard the gruesome details of how the alleged operation was carried out.

The prosecution lawyer said: “The conspiracy involved the slaughter of about 350 sheep, all that have been slaughtered inhumanely.

“Vehicles and weapons have been taken to the location on local farmers’ fields, the sheep are captured and a knife is taken to their throats and they suffer a slow and painful death.

“A pipe is then inserted into the throat of the sheep which are blown up, they are skinned and their remains are left at the scene.”

NFU county adviser for Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland, Harriet Ranson, who was involved in the case from the beginning and liaised with police throughout, said she was delighted with the outcome.

“These crimes were horrific, barbaric and unprecedented and had the whole livestock farming community in Northamptonshire and neighbouring counties living in fear that they would be next for months,” she said.

“It is fantastic to see the courts treating these appalling crimes with the seriousness they deserve and handing down suitably lengthy prison terms to these dangerous men.

“This case really highlights how important local information from farmers, the NFU and the public is in helping to bring offenders before the courts.

“We’d like to thank Northamptonshire Police, their rural crime team and the police and crime commissioner for their relentless pursuit of these criminals and we hope this case sends out a clear message to anyone planning to do something similar – you will get caught and you will get punished.”

Sentencing: Iordan and Nutu were both handed jail terms of four years and four months and Manu was ordered to serve two years and 11 months inside.

Warwickshire Rural Crime Team (Facebook post)

Whitby, North Yorkshire: Lesley and Alexander Cameron

#TheList Lesley Cameron (aka Lesley Grimshaw), born 01/04/1960 of 30 Dundas Gardens, Whitby YO21 1HD and Alexander Cameron, born 08/10/88 of 2 Greens Yard, Church Street, Whitby YO22 4AY – left their pet dog suffering in pain with a foul-smelling infection

Dog abuser Alexander Cameron from Whitby
Alexander Cameron and his mother Lesley Cameron are banned from keeping animals until 2030 after being convicted of cruelty to their pet Akita

Lesley Cameron and her son Alexander Cameron pleaded guilty to offences related to causing unnecessary suffering to their pet dog, Tigerlilly The Akita was suffering from a painful uterus infection but her owners failed to take her to the vet for treatment.

The court heard that an RSPCA inspector visited the pair’s home on November 28, 2019, after concerns were raised that the dog had missed her last three vet appointments.

Upon arrival, the RSPCA, along with North Yorkshire Police, found Tigerlily in a sorry state and suffering from pyometra.

Abused Akita Tigerlilly
A deprivation order was placed on neglected Akita Tigerlilly who will now be rehomed

RSPCA inspector Claire Little said: “I’ve met Tigerlily many times over many years and she’s a very friendly dog who has always come to the door to meet me.

“Upon entering the room where Tigerlily was lying on the floor, there was a noticeable and unpleasant smell, and she didn’t get up which worried me.

“I encouraged her to stand up so I could check her over, which she did, and she had lost weight from my last visit.

“Immediately I could see that the fur around her back end was wet and dirty.

“As she stood up I could smell the unpleasant smell more strongly and upon closer examination, I saw a greeny milky coloured discharge from her body

“The fur around there was soaked and appeared sticky when touched and her fur was matted.”

Dog abuser Alex Cameron with victim Tigerlilly

She added: “Ms Cameron allowed me to take Tigerlily to the vets for examination and she was taken into possession by police on vet advice and placed in RSPCA care pending the outcome of my investigation.

“Tigerlily is doing really well with a foster family at the moment I am really happy that we’ll now be able to find a permanent home for her, where her needs will always be met.”

Dog abuser Alexander Cameron from Whitby

In addition to the disqualification, a deprivation order was placed on Tigerlily whose care will now pass to the RSPCA.

Sentencing:
Alexander Cameron – 12-month community order with 10 rehabilitation activity requirement days; 140 hours of unpaid work; total of £290 in costs and charges.

Lesley Cameron 12-month community order with 10 rehabilitation activity requirement days; £290 in costs and charges.

Both were banned from keeping animals for 10 years.

TeessideLive

Wolverhampton: Patrick Eagle

#TheList Patrick ‘Paddy’ Eagle, born 12/08/1998, of Deans Road, Wolverhampton – left his pony to suffer a horrific maggot-infested wound caused by a severely embedded headcollar

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.
Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony’s head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

Horse trader and backyard breeder of puppies and kittens Paddy Eagle pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to the two-year-old piebald colt.

A concerned member of the public contacted World Horse Welfare about a group of cobs kept near Walsall, West Midlands, and field officer Charlotte Melvin attended the site in October 2019.

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

A spokesman for the charity said Charlotte noticed a strong smell when she approached the last pony.

“On closer inspection Charlotte discovered the pony, now named Moses, had a severely embedded headcollar. The wound was very badly infected and full of maggots,” he said.

“Charlotte contacted the RSPCA, police, vets and a transporter. The pony was removed under the Animal Welfare Act and transported to the vets for urgent treatment.”

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

The spokesman said Moses remained at the vets for four days owing to the extent of his injury, after which he was taken to the charity’s Penny Farm Rescue and Rehoming Centre.

“Given how horrific the wound from his headcollar was, I’m really happy with the recovery Moses has made,” said Charlotte.

“Moses’ suffering could so easily have been prevented and it’s awful to think he could have been left like that if someone hadn’t cared enough to report the situation.”

“Thanks to the person who reported him, Moses is now happy and healthy and will be able to find a loving new home through our rehoming scheme,” said Charlotte.

Gypsy Paddy Eagle allowed a headcollar to become embedded in his pony's head, causing a deep infected wound riddled with maggots.

In mitigation, the court heard gypsy traveller Eagle suffered from mental health issues which affected his ability to care for the pony.

Sentencing: 12-week suspended sentence; £400 costs; 60 hours of unpaid work. Banned from keeping equines for 10 years.

Horse and Hound
Blackpool Gazette

Howley, Warrington: Emma Connolly

#TheList Emma Jane Connolly, born 1989, of Wellington Street, Howley, Warrington WA1 – left her elderly pet dog to suffer with multiple ailments

Dog abuser Emma Jane Connolly from Warrington, UK

Single mother-of-two Emma Connolly admitted two counts of causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal in that she failed to seek veterinary treatment for her desperately ill 16-year-old Staffy Lucie.

Dog abuser Emma Jane Connolly from Warrington, UK

Lucie was suffering from a skin condition, ‘excessive thirst’ and hind leg weakness and pain. She was very sadly put to sleep.

Sentencing: eight-week curfew; ordered to pay £1,310 in costs and charges. Banned from keeping all animals for 10 years.

Warrington Guardian

Ferguslie Park, Paisley: Owen Gillespie

#TheList Owen Anthony Gillespie, born 09/02/1979, of 17 Westwood Gardens, Paisley PA3 1NA – left a desperately ill dog in agony and locked in a cage

Convicted dog abuser Owen Gillespie from Paisley, Renfrewshire

Gillespie failed to take his pet Staffy, Stella, to the vet to treat a chronic ear condition and an injured foot.

The nine-year-old dog was also suffering from a severe oesophageal condition which left her vomiting violently and in pain.

This resulted in her having to be euthanised by the Scottish SPCA as her condition was too severe to be treated.

The SSPCA attended at Gillespie’s home on April 25, 2019, after they received a call to say a dog could be heard screaming in pain at the property.

When they arrived around 10.45am they found the bull terrier vomiting in a cage in the living room and Gillespie told the officers she had been sick for a few days.

The court heard that Gillespie had not taken the dog to the vet as he couldn’t afford it.

Procurator fiscal depute Laura Wilcox said: “The SSPCA officer explained to Gillespie the reason for her visit and asked if she could view the dog.

“He agreed and invited her into the property where she saw the dog in a cage in the living room.

Staffy Stella, who was neglected by her owner to the extent that she had to be put to sleep

“The dog was in a good bodily condition and seemed bright but she was concerned because the flooring of the cage was covered in watery vomit and the dog was retching as if it was going to be sick.

“He informed the officer that she had eaten the outer covering of a tennis ball a few days prior.

“He let her out of the cage and the officer saw that the dog was lame on her right leg.”

Gillespie was told that the dog would have to receive treatment and that he would qualify for financial help from PDSA as he was unemployed.

It was once the dog was treated by the animal charity’s vet that the full extent of her condition was discovered.

Ms Wilcox added: “Her right front foot was inflamed and there was a nail that was loose. Both ear canals were inflamed, thickened, narrowed and were infected by bacteria and yeast. There was a smell coming from both ears.

“Her abdomen was tense and uncomfortable and it was found that her stomach wall was thickened and that her oesophagus was inflamed and flaccid.

“This meant it was ineffective at propelling food to her stomach.

“Her condition continued to worsen and she continued to vomit and at this point it was decided the best course of action was to euthanise her.”

The court heard the vet had concluded that if Gillespie had sought vet treatment for his dog within an appropriate time, he would have lessened the suffering.

However, prosecutors could not say whether the dog would have survived due to the severity of the stomach condition.

Staffy Stella, who was neglected by her owner to the extent that she had to be put to sleep

Gillespie pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to his dog between February and April 2019 by failing to seek adequate care to treat an injured foot, persistent vomiting and an ear condition.

His lawyer, Amy Spencer said: “He has already paid a penalty in regards to this as he has lost his much-loved dog.

“This is a heartbreaking case for him. He is still completely traumatised.

“He is embarrassed by his actions and he knows he ought to have sought treatment for Stella. He has worked his whole adult life and recently lost his job.

“He really was hoping she would have made a recovery.”

Sentencing: ordered to pay a £500 fine. Banned from keeping dogs for just one year.

Daily Record

Shrewsbury, Shropshire: Steven To and Charlotte Plimmer

#TheList Steven Sai Chong To, born 21/03/1992, and wife Charlotte Plimmer, born 15/11/1996, both of 13 Theatre Royal Apartments, 15 Shoplatch, Shrewsbury SY1 1HR – for cruelty offences relating to four kittens

Cat killers Steven To and wife Charlotte Plimmer
Cat killers Steven To and wife Charlotte Plimmer. Sadist To is banned from keeping animals for life while Plimmer received a seven-year ban

Takeaway worker Steven To killed two kittens and inflicted months of abuse on two others while his wife, Charlotte To (née Plimmer) failed to react to the ongoing cruelty.

Between August 2018 and March 2019, the Tos inflicted abuse which RSPCA veterinarian Dr David Martin said was the worst he had seen in his 22 years of practice.

The court heard how eight-week-old kittens Jin and Sun, and two-month-old pets Moon and Mew, suffered seizures, broken bones, infections, hair and skin loss, multiple amputations and tail lacerations which left one “hanging on by a thread”.

Steven To pleaded guilty to three animal cruelty charges relating to harming the cats, and Charlotte To pleaded guilty to four charges of failing to provide a safe environment and veterinary care.

Prosecuting on behalf of the RSPCA, Sara Pratt, said: “The defendants lived together with their kittens in a flat in Shrewsbury.

“Over the period of August 2018 and March 2019, they acquired a total of four kittens, two of which were killed while in the care of the defendants, as a result of the actions of Steven To – Jin was almost 12 weeks old and Mew was just five months old at the time of their deaths.”

Cat killers Steven To and wife Charlotte Plimmer.

The court heard Jin and Sun were registered at Animal Trusts Vets and deemed healthy in August 2018, before Moon and Mew were registered at a different practice, Copthorne Veterinary Clinic, in November 2018.

Ms Pratt added: “On September 14, 2018, a phone call was made to Animal Trust Vets reporting that Jin had been playing, knocked over some recycling, started having a seizure and died.

“On September 21, Sun was anaesthetised and X-rays revealed a fresh fracture to her right tibia.”

The court heard in October 2018, Sun was taken to the vets with two “kinks” in her tail, before returning three days later with it “hanging off”.

The defendants bought Moon and Mew in November 2018, before Sun was taken to the vets again with hair and skin loss.

Mew then suffered an injury to her chin where the skin had become detached from her jaw bone and required surgery, the court heard.

Ms Pratt said: “Just seven days after surgery to her avulsed chin, Mew was returned to Copthorne Vets with an extreme fracture dislocation midway down the tail – all tendons had been ripped.”

Mew was found dead on the kitchen floor days after returning from the vets following a tail amputation.

The court heard that an RSPCA post mortem found evidence of blunt trauma to the right side of the cat’s thorax and neck, as well as evidence that the cat had lost blood externally through the nose.

The court then heard how in February 2019, Moon was taken to Abbey Veterinary Centre starved, and again with a leg fracture in March.

Following concerns raised by the veterinary practices and the RSPCA, later that month Moon and Sun were seized by police and a full investigation was launched.

A report by Dr Martin stated that it was “clear” all four cats sustained “serious injuries” and that two died from “traumatic incidents”.

He added: “It is exceptionally unusual to have such a significant incidence of serious trauma in four cats over such a short period of time, to the extent that in 22 years of veterinary practice, I have never seen or heard of such a high incidence of serious injury.”

2011 photo of Charlotte Plimmer
2011 photo of Charlotte Plimmer

District Judge Kevin Grego said there was “no doubt” a lifetime ban was necessary for Mr To, and that Mrs To should not have “covered her eyes” to the ongoing abuse.

He said: “The penny must have dropped after a short period of time. She [Mrs To] either should have got those animals out of the house or at the very least ensured it wasn’t going to happen again.”

Judge Grego added: “Animal cruelty is incisive of a mindset that’s corrosive and damaging – that’s what makes this so serious.

“There should be no doubt the animals that died and suffered did so as a result of deliberate cruelty from you, Steven.

“That cruelty and death could have been avoided if you, Charlotte, didn’t frankly cover your eyes and accept what your husband told you when you knew what you were being told was unsustainable

Sentencing: Steven To was sentenced to 22 weeks in prison, suspended for 18 months, with 200 hours of unpaid work, 25 days of rehabilitation, a lifetime ban on keeping animals and was ordered to pay £5,000 court costs, more than £3,500 in vets’ fees and a £122 surcharge.

Charlotte To was given a 12-month community order, with 25 days of rehabilitation, 40 hours of unpaid work, a seven-year ban on owning animals and was ordered to pay £390 costs.

Shropshire Star

Tiverton, Devon: Ian and Ann Ware

#TheList Ian Ware, born 13/05/1946 , and Ann Ware, born c. 1960, both of Holly Road, Tiverton EX16 6HZ – failed to take their badly injured cat to the vet

Ann Ware from Tiverton, Devon
Ann Ware and husband Ian are banned from keeping animals until March 2023

The RSPCA visited the home of Ian and Ann Ware in September 2019 after receiving a call from a concerned member of the public.

The grey and white cat, known as Snowball, was rushed to a vet by RSPCA Inspector Charlotte Coggins where he had to be put to sleep because of the severity of his condition.

Inspector Coggins said: “The pinna was damaged, leaving the cartilage of the ear canal exposed.

“Around the ear canal there was a deep deficit in the skin and underlying muscle to the extent that the bone of the skull could be seen rostral to the ear canal.

“The diagnosis from the vet was of a chronic severe deep infection of the ear canal and surrounding tissues. The exact cause could not be ascertained on clinical examination but it may have resulted from a bite to the area from another cat or rodent.

“As a result of this infection, the vet found Snowball to be suffering severe pain and that the infection had been present for some time based on the severity and extent of tissue destruction including damage to the cartilage of the ear canal.”

The defendants admitted causing unnecessary suffering to Snowball by failing to provide prompt or effective professional veterinary care and attention for the severe and chronic infected wound of the left ear canal and surrounding tissue.

Sentencing: four-week curfew order; £110 each in court costs. Banned from keeping animals for three years.

DevonLive

Hereford: Ian Reidy

#TheList Ian Mark Reidy, born 10/01/1989, of 32 Springfield Avenue, Hereford HR2 7JH – left his horse to suffer with a broken leg for two months

Ian Reidy's 11-year-old gelding, known as Brownie, was found unable to bear weight on the affected leg, with pressure sores from lying down, and muscle wastage
Ian Reidy’s 11-year-old gelding, known as Brownie, was found unable to bear weight on the affected leg, with pressure sores from lying down, and muscle wastage

The court heard Reidy failed to act on veterinary advice in relation to his 11-year-old horse, Brownie’s, broken leg between July 26 and September 19, 2019.

RSPCA Inspector Suzi Smith investigated after the animal welfare charity received a call about a horse with a severe untreated leg injury.

Ms Smith said: “Initially it appeared Brownie had collapsed. He seemed unable to get up. The foot was worn at the toe from the continued dragging of it over the weeks. He was wearing a thick rug in warm weather.

“Once we did get him up, he was non-weight bearing on the front leg. Upon removal of the rug it showed he was underweight with muscle atrophy to the broken leg where the muscle had wasted away over the weeks from his inability to use the leg. He had a pressure sore on his hock from the excessive time he had been spending laid down due to the pain.

“An x-ray showed his elbow to be in three pieces and vets found it was too late to perform any surgery to help.

“Reidy had initially called a vet when the injury occurred but refused to follow their advice before putting them off when they called to request a check-up of Brownie on eleven occasions, instead telling them he was getting better, rather than seeking the help Brownie desperately needed.”

Sentencing: 12-week custodial sentence. Ordered to pay a £122 victim surcharge. Banned from keeping any equine for life.

The court also made a seizure order for the remaining horses Reidy owned, but he told the court he had given them away.

Hereford Times
Horse and Hound

Blackpool, Lancashire: Carl Dyson

#TheList Carl Anthony Dyson, born 03/04/1979, of 90 Belmont Avenue, Blackpool FY1 4BG – killed a cat by dropping a concrete slab onto her head to “put it out of its misery”

Cat killer Carl Dyson from Blackpool
Cat killer Carl Dyson’s actions were described in court as “inhuman”

Father-of-two Dyson admitted killing the female black and white long-haired cat, called Paddy, at an address on Salthouse Avenue, Blackpool, on October 23, 2019.

The court heard how Dyson had been seen by a neighbour carrying Paddy, wrapped in a pink towel, into his friend’s back garden, where he dropped a large concrete slab twice on the animal’s head.

The witness said they saw the cat trying to wriggle free before Dyson let go of the slab.

Paul Ridehalgh, prosecuting on behalf of the RSPCA, said the witness “saw Dyson drop a slab as thick as a laptop on the cat’s head as it lay in the yard”, and added: “She saw the cat try and escape from the blanket before Dyson did the same thing again.”

The neighbour alerted the RSPCA and inspectors found “a plethora” of traumatic injuries to Paddy’s head.

Mr Ridehalgh said: “The inspector observer a black and white plastic cat carrier that appeared to have blood on it. Inside he found the body of a black and white cat.

“The cat appeared to have suffered massive injuries to her head, as it was crushed on one side, with its eye bulging.

“The defendant said he believed the cat may have been hit by a car.”

Cat killer Carl Dyson from Blackpool

After telling Paddy’s owner, Anthony Johnson, what had happened, the cat’s body was taken away for further inspection.

Mr Ridehalgh said: “The cat had suffered traumatic injuries to its head. The conclusion was that these injuries were caused by forceful, violent compression of the cat’s head. The death could have been very quick.

“The cat could have been suffering from some cancerous lumps in the head area. Vets also examined the cat and found it to be in a poor condition, it was severely underweight with fleas jumping off her. The fur was matted and covered in faeces.

“The cat’s head had clearly been crushed. The vet’s opinion was that the cat’s injuries were unsurvivable. In her opinion, the cat’s death would have certainly caused suffering… the dropping of a concrete slab on a cat is not an acceptable method of euthanasia, and any reasonable person would have taken the cat to a vet.”

A veterinary examination found the cat had been suffering from a cancerous tumour in the mouth and was severely underweight.

When interviewed by the RSPCA, the defendant claimed he thought the cat had been injured in a road accident and he “panicked”.

Dyson’s lawyer Gary McAnulty of Fylde Law told the court his client “was suffering at the time with some mental health problems, anxiety and depression.”

Sentencing Dyson, magistrate Ed Beaman said: “The cat was trying to escape the blanket and was not so ill as to be accepting of its fate.

“There’s evidence that the cat was distressed while in the blanket prior to the first impact. We believe the cat was still alive prior to the second impact, and this caused distress to both the cat and the witnesses who saw the offence.”

Sentencing: 12 weeks in jail (released on bail after lodging an appeal). Ordered to pay a total of £200 coss and charges. Banned from owning, keeping or managing animals indefinitely.

Blackpool Gazette
Birmingham Mail

Moreton, Wirral: Paula McNeil

#TheList Paula McNeil, born 06/01/1981, of 30 Yew Tree Road, Moreton, Wirral CH46 8UB – failed to take her desperately ill dog to the vet and left her to suffer for months in agony

Animal abuser Paula McNeil from Moreton, Wirral, Merseyside

Paula McNeil was banned from keeping animals for six years after “one of the worst cases” an RSPCA inspector said they had come across.

Inspector Anthony Joynes said the dog – a bull terrier cross known as Sahara – was “completely let down by her owner, became emaciated and was and left to suffer” with an untreated burst abscess on her neck and chin. She was in such a bad way vets had no choice but to put her to sleep on humane grounds.

Sahara in healthier times
Sahara in healthier times

McNeil admitted neglecting Sahara and pleaded guilty to one charge of causing unnecessary suffering.

Inspector Joynes was first called to investigate after McNeil had taken Sahara to the vets to be put down on September 11, 2019.

Seeing that the dog was in pain, the vet complied but alerted the RSPCA.

Inspector Joynes was sent to collect the body of Sahara and a detailed veterinary examination was carried out the following day.

He said: “As soon as I entered the surgery I was met with an incredibly strong and unforgettable smell of necrosis and infection.

“I described the dog as being emaciated with the bones of the ribs, pelvis and spine being clearly visible.

“There was clear muscle atrophy and the coat was dull, sticky and stained throughout, particularly the rear legs, with faeces and urine.

“I observed a large melon-sized open necrotic mass which appeared to cover the whole of the dog’s neck under the chin.

“There was pus clearly visible oozing out of this area as it was manipulated and the smell was overpowering. I noted two other severe, deep open sores to the front right leg which had the appearance of pressure sores.

“Both of these wounds appeared to be right down to the bone and pus was present.

Animal abuser Paula McNeil from Moreton, Wirral, Merseyside

Hollie Jones, a vet at Upton Veterinary Centre, who carried out a detailed veterinary examination said in her medical report that the most notable abnormality was a very large ulcerated ruptured mass present on the jaw and neck extending into the right side of the face.

Part of it was exposing underlying tissues where the mass had burst and there was a large amount of pus coming from the area and parts of the skin were necrotic. She said Sahara would have suffered with this wound for months.

She also found severe pressure sores on her right side – these were full thickness through the skin to the bones – exposing tendons and other joints.

Faeces and urine had caused an infection in the sores suggesting that Sahara had been left in a collapsed state laying on her side for at least a week.

She was also severely emaciated with all her bones protruding and weighed 18.2 kgs.

The vet said she would have expected a dog of this type to weigh around 39kg and added the wound to her neck would have made eating in the latter stages impossible

McNeil claimed during her interview that the abscess was caused by a bee sting just weeks before.

Inspector Joynes said: “The vet report shows Sahara had been suffering from this abscess in her neck for months without treatment and because of this it had broken down and become necrotic.

“This had led to her collapsed state and pressure sores on her body indicate she was left like this for weeks. She was also unable to eat because of the severity of the wound.

“There is never an excuse to deprive any pet in need of veterinary attention and in this case Sahara was neglected for such a long period of time. Photographs show how she was a healthy dog before.

“In my 11 years as an inspector it was one of the worst cases of its type I have come across – she was completely let down by her owner and left to suffer. Even when she had collapsed help was not sought for her immediately.”

Sentencing: 12-month community order for a period of 12 months, with 15 rehabilitation activity requirement days; 160 hours of unpaid work. Ordered to pay a total of £1,395.86 in costs and charges. Six-year ban on keeping animals.

Liverpool Echo