Sunderland: Lian Wilson and Daniel Mark Jones

#TheList Lian Wilson, born 1974, and son Daniel Mark Jones, born c. 1997, both of Ramillies Road, Red House, Sunderland SR5 5JF – left their wounded pony chained on an allotment

Horse abusers Lian Wilson and son Daniel Mark Jones from Sunderland

RSPCA prosecutor Denise Jackman told the court how piebald stallion Milo was found on July 11, 2016, after concerns were raised for a horse at Downhill Allotments, in Sunderland.

Animal collection officers attended the scene and found Milo with a chain wrapped around his neck, with his head collar entangled in the chain. There was a large wound under the animal’s chin.

Abused pony Milo was found tethered by a rope to the ground. Now his owners Lian Wilson and Daniel Mark Jones of Sunderland have been banned from keeping horses.
Abused pony Milo was found tethered by a rope to the ground. Now his owners Lian Wilson and Daniel Mark Jones of Sunderland have been banned from keeping horses.

“The piebald pony was tethered to the ground by a chain and rope,” Mrs Jackman said.

“The tether had become embedded in the skin, behind the ears and top of the neck, and there was a large wound under its chin.”

The court heard a vet and the police were called and Milo was released with bolt cutters.

Jones then appeared by the field asking why they were taking his pony away. Mrs Jackman said Milo was taken away and for further veterinary examination.

She added: “It became immediately clear that the depth of the wounds were much greater than previously thought.”

Mrs Jackman said: “The vet was of the opinion that the pony has suffered unnecessarily.

On July 14, 2016, Wilson contacted the RSPCA and stated she was the joint owner of the pony, with her son.

The following day the pair were visited by the RSPCA and refused to sign the pony over to the charity.

“The horse has now, this morning, been signed over the the RSPCA,” Mrs Jackman said.

Wilson told the inspector she was unaware of wounds, while her son said he checked the horse in between his work shifts and that he changed the horse’s position in the tether every 10 days.

Mrs Jackman referred to guidance from Defra, which states that a tether should be be used only as a short-term measure, and should be used only while stopping during short journeys and under increased supervision.

The pair both admitted causing unnecessary suffering to Milo.

Bench chairman Peter De Vere said: “From the photographs we can clearly see that the horse was suffering but the rest of the horse looked well.

“This was for a short period of time.”

Sentencing:
Total fines and charges of £334.50 each. Banned from keeping horses and ponies for five years with the right to appeal after just one year.

Sunderland Echo

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