Category Archives: hare coursing

Frimley, Camberley, Surrey: Samuel Haylett

#TheList Samuel Haylett, born 30/09/1989, of Barnes Road, Frimley, Camberley GU16 – for hare coursing

Samuel Haylett, who  was caught hare coursing on private land in Essex
Samuel Haylett, who was caught hare coursing on private land in Essex

Sam Haylett was made subject of a Criminal Behaviour Order (CBO) for hare coursing after Essex Police responded to reports near Blind Lane, West Hanningfield, south Essex.

Haylett admitted trespass in pursuit of game.

The CBO prohibits him from being in possession of a catapult, shot or an air weapon in a public place, bans him from being in the possession, control and company of any dog within Essex unless travelling to a pre-arranged emergency vet’s appointment, stops him from having a dog off a lead unless on private land or with the land owner’s consent and bans him from associating with three men in a public place.

At around 2pm on Sunday 13 October 2019, Essex Police received reports about hare coursing off Blind Lane.

An off-duty police officer was in the area and spotted Haylett, who was in possession of dogs who were in pursuit of a hare. This lasted around 30 seconds.

She then told Haylett to stop and put herself on duty before other officers arrived and arrested him.

The police took photographs of Haylett covered in mud before they seized a car, mobile phones, catapults and stones.

Haylett was interviewed under caution before being reported for the offence.

Chief Inspector Terry Balding, head of Rural Engagement Team, said: “The quick-actions by members of the community and an off-duty officer, who has an extensive knowledge of wildlife and countryside pursuits, has resulted in a man receiving a conviction for hare coursing.

“The order, which is the first we have ever secured for hare coursing, will restrict his activities, his movements and his associates and will help protect rural communities countrywide.

“Hare coursing isn’t just an illegal and cruel activity, it causes disruption and damage to private land and crops, it can have a financial impact on businesses and it endangers the safety of people living and working in the area.

“We remain dedicated, along with our policing colleagues, in the combat of hare coursing and we will continue to track down and deal with offenders such as Haylett.”

Roger Hirst, Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner for Essex, said: “Tackling rural crime is an important priority in my Police and Crime Plan and it is great to see the Essex Police Rural Engagement Team taking such a proactive approach to protecting our rural communities.

“Hare coursing is a dangerous and frightening crime committed in isolated areas of our county.

“It can make our rural communities feel vulnerable in their own homes and this is totally unacceptable.

“Securing this order sends a clear message that rural crime is not acceptable, it will be tackled and those committing offences will be caught.”

Sentencing: in addition to the Criminal Behaviour Order, Haylett was ordered to pay a total of £569 in fines, costs and charges.

Essex Police news

Maidstone Kent: Jimmy Price, Samuel Powell and Danny Price

#TheList Maidstone gypsies and serial animal abusers Jimmy Price, born c. 1994, of Forstal Farm, Well Street, Loose ME15 0QE, Samuel ‘Johnny’ Powell, born c. 1985, of Wheat Gratten Stableyards, Forstal Road, Lenham ME17 2BF, Danny Price, born c. 1990, of Victoria Stables, Victoria Court, East Farleigh ME15 0BW

Serial abusers from Maidstone, Kent, UK Samuel Powell (left) and career criminal Jimmy Price were both jailed for animal cruelty.
Serial animal abusers Samuel Powell (left) and Jimmy Price were both jailed for their latest acts of cruelty.

Jimmy Price and Samuel Powell were sent to prison after the former was filmed repeatedly stabbing a deer and the latter had put an eight-month-old foal to work. Price was also found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering to a horse and two dogs.

Qualified jockey Danny Price left a horse to starve to death but was let off with a community order and not banned from keeping animals.

Jimmy Price’s brother, Danny Price – a qualified jockey – admitted letting a horse starve to death and received a community order.

Jimmy Price's brother Danny was convicted after his bay horse was found dead next to a hay bale during the RSPCA raid in March 2019. He had starved to death
Jimmy Price’s brother Danny was convicted after his bay horse was found dead next to a hay bale during the RSPCA raid in March 2019. He had starved to death

A video played to the court showed Jimmy Price’s dogs, Scout and Tramp, untethered and unfed at the father-of-two’s home address in Forstal Farm, Loose.

Convicted animal abuser Jimmy Price from Maidstone, Kent, UK
Jimmy Price, who has previous convictions for violence and dishonesty, is a father of two

A voice in the video was heard to say: “If they run away good luck to them, I tell you what you’re the wickedest fella I’ve ever seen in my life.”

Jimmy Price, who has a history of violence, was previously convicted in December 2019 after repeatedly stabbing a deer. He was also caught hare coursing.

Still from the horrifying video in which Jimmy Price stabs a deer repeatedly while being goaded by three unknown accomplices

Rowan Morton, prosecuting for the RSPCA, said today: “It’s very difficult to even explain the gravity of what the video shows.

“There are a group of four males that can be seen with a deer. Jimmy Price is seen stabbing the deer multiple times in the throat while others shout at him to stab it.

“It’s very graphic and upsetting, there was no doubt that animal was caused significant pain and suffering.”

Convicted animal abuser Jimmy Price from Maidstone, Kent, UK, with partner Chanelle Treeby
Jimmy Price with partner Chanelle Treeby

Price, who was already serving a suspended sentence for theft offences, has previously been convicted of causing unnecessary suffering to dogs.

Persistent criminal Jimmy Price was found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering to two dogs and a horse
Persistent criminal Jimmy Price was found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering to two dogs and a horse

When Tramp and Scout were taken into the RSPCA’s care and fed properly, they gained 25% bodyweight and 45% bodyweight respectively within seven weeks.

Convicted animal abuser Jimmy Price from Maidstone, Kent, UK
Jimmy Price was previously convicted of hare coursing

Price’s dogs and the horse, which belonged to his late father, were seized during an RSPCA raid on Forstal Farm in March 2019.

Horse trader Samuel Powell had three horses seized during the same raid, having had a mare and her foal seized two months prior.

Convicted animal abuser Samuel Powell from Maidstone, Kent, UK
Samuel Powell

Four of the horses were found to be emaciated. One was suffering with diarrhoea and the foal had breathing problems, fleas and was described as “very thin”.

A Shetland Pony was found with a cut across the nose.

Powell accepted each of the horses was his own, but said they were in that condition as he was rehabilitating them.

He told the court: “I will buy horses that have not been treated properly. When I get them I feed them, look after them and rehabilitate them. Then I sell them for profit.

“I like to think I sometimes save lives when I buy horses.”

When asked where he buys his horses, Powell said: “I don’t want to go into too much detail as I’m from the gypsy community.”

In 2019 Powell was convicted of causing unnecessary suffering to a foal which was seen walking up and down at Appleby Horse Fair pulling a cart with people in.

On Friday 10/01/2020 Powell was found guilty of four counts of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal and a fifth charge of failing to ensure the welfare of an animal. The five charges relate to the five horses seized from Forstal Farm.

Danny Price admitted causing unnecessary suffering to a bay horse. In return charges of causing suffering to a bay mare, a black mare and a piebald mare, were dropped.

Convicted animal abuser and qualified jockey Danny Price from Maidstone
Horse killer Daniel Price

The bay horse was found dead next to a hay bale during the RSPCA raid in March 2019. He had starved to death.

Magistrates heard the 29-year-old had stopped looking after the horse as he was in the process of selling it, and thought it was the new owner’s responsibility.

Sentencing:
Jimmy Price – jailed for seven and a half months of which half will be spent in custody. Ordered to pay £5,115 in costs and charges. Five-year order banning him from keeping dogs.

Samuel Powell – jailed for 26 weeks and will serve half of that sentence. Ordered to pay total of £5,115. Banned from owning horses for five years but can appeal after just one year.

Danny Price – 12-month community order; 150 hours of unpaid work; ordered to pay £1,585.

Kent Online

Chesterton, Cambridge and Slough, Berkshire: James Crickmore, John Jefford, Denny Loveridge and Mark Loveridge

#TheList serial hare coursers James Crickmore, John Jefford, Denny Loveridge and Mark Loveridge all of Cambridge – all are now bound by a 3-year court injunction not to enter Cambridgeshire during the hare coursing season

Cambridge hare coursers

Mark Loveridge, 38, of Milton Place, Horton, Slough, was suspected of 13 hare coursing incidents. He must not own a sighthound or drive a four-wheel-drive vehicle during hare coursing season.

Gypsy traveller and hare courser Mark Loveridge from Slough has a taste for animal cruelty
Gypsy traveller and hare courser Mark Loveridge from Slough has a taste for animal cruelty

John Jefford, 42, of 125/127 Scotland Road, Cambridge CB4 1QL was suspected of 13 hare coursing incidents. He must not own a sighthound or be in the company of another person with one.

Denny Loveridge, 38, of Mill Place Caravan Park, Datchet, Slough was suspected of 17 incidents. He must not own a sighthound or drive a four-wheel-drive vehicle during hare coursing season.

Hare courser Denny Loveridge, another gypsy traveller from Slough
Hare courser Denny Loveridge, another gypsy traveller from Slough

James Crickmore, 38, of 2 Sunningdale, Fen Road, Cambridge CB4 1UN was suspected of 26 incidents. He must not own a sighthound or be in the company of another person with one.

Serial hare courser James Crickmore of Sunningdale, Fen Rd, Cambridge CB4
Serial hare courser James Crickmore of Sunningdale, Fen Rd, Cambridge CB4

All four are bound by an injunction handed down by a county court judge in a successful case brought by Cambridgeshire police.

The injunctions will mean the men cannot enter any farm land in Cambridgeshire during the months of the hare coursing season (31 July to 31 March) for the next three years.

The men were caught by police using a new database designed to track and convict suspected hare coursers.

A police spokesman said: “The judge was satisfied that he had heard evidence showing the men had been involved in hare coursing over a two year period and therefore handed the men injunctions.”

Related image

PC Gareth Tanner said: “This is an excellent result for the rural community and one of the first of its kind. I’m confident that the conditions granted will be effective.

“This has been a considerable piece of work, both due to the complexity of the tactics used, and the amount of evidence presented at court because of the sheer persistence of these individuals.

“Hare coursing costs the farming community thousands every year in damages to crops and land, as well as the obvious cruelty issues.”

Cambs Times

wildlife crime ring from Devon, Dorset, Somerset and South Wales

#TheList for the persecution of wildlife including badgers and deer plus dog cruelty: Graham Coombes, Oliver Blatch, Kenneth Danes, Gethyn Durham, Dean McGrath, Pheon Radford, Ryan Robinson, Joseph O’Connor, Brian Forrest, Philip Cross and Daniel Ravenscroft

A blood-thirsty gang from Devon, Dorset, Somerset and South Wales who set savage dogs on foxes, deer, rabbits, badgers - and even a llama - in bid to 'kill as much wildlife as possible'
 Graham Coombes was the ringleader of a blood-thirsty gang who set savage dogs on foxes, deer, rabbits, badgers – and even a llama – in bid to ‘kill as much wildlife as possible’

Eleven men were sentenced – three receiving jail terms – for their part in a series of “abhorrent” attacks by dogs on deer, badgers and foxes. Graphic and distressing video footage found on the mobile phone of the ringleader Graham Coombes was shown in court, showing dogs savaging badgers and deer as the accused looked on and gave encouragement.

Analysis of one of the men’s phones revealed thousands of text messages, including one in which he claimed to have used his dogs to kill 178 deer, 894 rabbits, 28 foxes and 22 hares in just six months.

Jeremy Cave, prosecuting for the RSPCA, said the ‘primary motivation seems to be gratuitous pleasure’.

Mr Cave said the group would go out ‘lamping’ – using powerful lamps at night to startle and stun deer before setting dogs, usually lurchers, on them.

He said their aim was ‘to kill as much wildlife as possible’.

Mr Cave said Coombes was at the ‘centre of the operation, organising nights out, posting trophy pictures on social media’.

The other men involved were Oliver Blatch, Kenneth Danes, Gethyn Durham, Brian Forrest, Dean McGrath, Joseph O’Connor, Pheon Radford, Ryan Robinson, Philip Cross and Daniel Ravenscroft.

Mr Cave said that of the 27 offences, 22 were related to killing or attacking deer with dogs, four matters were of animal welfare issues relating to the dogs – including neglect – and another was the possession of a dangerous dog.

A blood-thirsty gang from Devon, Dorset, Somerset and South Wales who set savage dogs on foxes, deer, rabbits, badgers - and even a llama - in bid to 'kill as much wildlife as possible'
Graham Coombes organised animal hunting that involved the training of dogs who were ‘[his] tools; tools to hunt and kill’.

The court heard how a search of Coombes’ land by Trading Standards found a pile of animal carcasses with at least 20 separate skulls at the top of the heap.

The incinerator operator informed RSPCA investigators they disposed of 604 kilos of animal products, all believed to be from hunts.

Coombes also got another person to shoot his severely injured dog after it had been fighting a badger ‘for four hours’.

Details of offences and sentencing:

Graham Coombes, born c. 1975, a groundworker of 2 Abbey Road, Bovey Tracey, Devon TQ13 9HZ pleaded guilty to three counts of intentionally killing deer at night on different dates in 2014. He pleaded guilty to two counts of willfully killing a badger and one of willfully injuring a badger. He pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to a terrier called Marley by failing to treat its injuries. Coombes was sentenced to a total of 20 weeks in prison. He was ordered to pay £3,000 court costs and £60 victim surcharge. He was disqualified for keeping dogs for life.

Oliver Blatch, born c. 1989, Little Acre, Back Lane, Sherborne, Dorset DT9 6SQ  pleaded guilty to two counts of killing deer at night. District Judge Baker noted Blatch was of previous good character before sentencing him to a total of eight weeks, suspended for one year, to complete 180 hours’ unpaid leave, pay £800 court costs and £60 victim surcharge.

Kenneth Danes, born c. 1987, of 11 Otterford Gypsy Park, Culmhead near Taunton TA3 7DX pleaded guilty to two counts of killing deer at night. District Judge Baker noted he was a hardworking man of good character and his early guilty plea. She sentenced him to a total of eight weeks suspended for 12 months and ordered him to pay £800 court costs, £60 victim surcharge and to forfeit his dog Cruz.

Joseph O’Connor, born c. 1993, a farmhand of Pontardawe near Swansea, admitted three charges of killing deer in 2014. District Judge Baker told O’Connor the killing of deer was “absolutely abhorrent, it’s barbaric”. However, she recognised his probation report showed genuine remorse and he was of previous good character. She also recognised his advocate’s observation that he was of “limited ability” and his “sense of shame”. She told him he had worked in agriculture his whole life yet despite that he involved himself in the killing of deer. He handed him a nine-week jail sentence, suspended for 12 months. He also had to complete 200 hours’ unpaid work, pay £800 court costs and £80 victim surcharge.

Gethyn Durham, born c. 1989, a landscape gardener of 36 Marl Court, Cwmbran, Gwent, admitted one count of killing a deer. He also pleaded guilty to possession of a pitbull-type dangerous dog and five charges of keeping other dogs in an unsuitable environment. District Judge Baker said she accepted his dog Bonnie was a “beloved family pet” but his probation report “shows [Durham] shows little remorse and has antipathy for the RSPCA and their work”.

Durham was jailed for six weeks followed by 12 months’ supervision. He was ordered to pay £800 court costs and £115 victim surcharge. As his partner broke down in the public gallery, District Judge Baker told Durham the legislation regarding dangerous dogs “ties my hands” and she ordered the dog be destroyed. Durham was also told he was disqualified from owning dogs for five years.

A blood-thirsty gang from Devon, Dorset, Somerset and South Wales who set savage dogs on foxes, deer, rabbits, badgers - and even a llama - in bid to 'kill as much wildlife as possible'
Gethyn Durham

Brian Forrest, born c. 1976, Upper Lodge, Tetton Estate, Kingston St Mary, near Taunton, owner of Brian Forrest Electrical, Taunton, pleaded guilty to a single count of killing deer. District Judge Baker also noted how he was of previous good character and he had shown genuine remorse. She sentenced him to six weeks jail, suspended for a year, to complete 140 hours unpaid work, pay £800 court costs and £60 victim surcharge. She also ordered him to forfeit his dog Eve.

Dean McGrath, born c. 1987, of Cwmbran, pleaded guilty to a single count of killing deer. McGrath was handed a six week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months. District Judge Baker ordered him to complete 160 hours’ unpaid work, pay £800 court costs and £60 victim surcharge. He was also ordered to forfeit his dog Blue.

Pheon Radford, born c. 1994, of 19 Cross Street, Pentre, Ystrad in the Rhondda Valley, pleaded guilty to killing a deer and causing unnecessary suffering to a dog. District Judge Baker said Radford left his dog Scar to suffer from an “unpleasant” injury and listed previous scars on its body. She said he had deliberately travelled from Wales to take part in the deer hunts with Cross. She sentenced him to a total of 10 weeks, suspended for 12 months; to complete 150 hours’ unpaid work, pay £800 court costs and £60 victim surcharge. He was also disqualified from keeping dogs for three years and to forfeit his dog Scar.

Ryan Robinson, born c. 1996, of 1 Foundry Court in Chudleigh, admitted taking a deer without the consent of the owner. He was handed a 12 month community order, must take part in a 10 day rehabilitation requirement, complete 200 hours’ unpaid work and pay £800 court costs and a victim surcharge of £85.

Philip Cross, born c. 1980, of 20 Bryn Ivor St,Tonypandy in the Rhondda was found guilty after trial of killing deer at night. He was jailed for eight weeks and disqualified for keeping dogs for five years. He was ordered to pay £4,000 court costs and £80 victim surcharge.

Philip Cross at the appeal hearing
Philip Cross

Daniel Ravenscroft, born c. 1979, of Pearroc Vean, Grange Rd, Buckfastleigh TQ11 was found guilty after trial of killing deer at night. District Judge Baker said she took into account his early guilty plea and his 10 years’ service in the British Army. She noted he had given up his dog voluntarily and his probation report spoke of how he recognised how low he had fallen and the devastation it had caused him, leaving him “so embarrassed, so remorseful and so ashamed”.

 Daniel Ravenscroft

Ravenscroft was sentenced to six weeks’ custody, suspended for 12 months, to complete 200 hours’ unpaid work, forfeit his dog and pay £4,000 court costs and £60 victim surcharge.

Speaking outside of court, RSPCA Chief Inspector Will Mitchell said Coombes’ phone contained around 30,000 images ‘mostly depicting wildlife crime and the use of dogs to kill wildlife, around 11,000 text messages, and videos’.

The texts contained a series of ‘colloquial descriptions of animals, so for badgers they were described as ‘pigs, ‘black and whites’, ‘humbugs’ and ‘smellies’.

He said: ‘There would be the bravado in terms of the type of dogs used and the successes of the dogs. They wanted them for the fight, for destruction.

‘They might say this was sport or pest control – but it’s blood lust.’

Daily Mail

===

In January 2018 it was reported that Daniel Ravenscroft and Philip Cross had appealed their convictions but the outcome of their appeals isn’t known.