Category Archives: Farm animals

Llandysul, Ceredigion: David and Evan Meirion Davies

#TheList farmers David Davies , born 1956, and brother Evan Meirion Davies, born 1969, both of Penffynnon Farm, Bangor Teifi, Llandysul SA44 4HX – for a catalogue of appalling cruelty to cattle

Cattle in the care of brothers David and Evan Meirion Davies were housed in terrible conditions, with no food, water or dry lying area.
Cattle in the care of brothers David and Evan Meirion Davies were housed in terrible conditions, with no food, water or dry lying area.

Brothers David Davies, and Evan Meirion Davies admitted 13 charges of animal cruelty.

The prosecution follows a visit by animal health officers and a Animal and Plant Health Agency vet to the farm in April 2018.

Officers found 58 cattle carcasses in various states of decay in the cattle sheds and surrounding fields. The remaining cattle were housed in terrible conditions, with no food, water or dry lying area.

The vet confirmed that the cattle were being caused unnecessary suffering, and also formed the opinion that the dead cattle had also succumbed to the horrendous conditions found in the sheds, and died of neglect. The vet had to euthanise two cattle to stop further suffering during visits to the premises.

This was the worst case of animal welfare neglect seen to date by the animal health team of Ceredigion County Council, they said.

In sentencing, the magistrates acknowledged the evidence of horrendous suffering, inadequate care and poor animal husbandry displayed by both defendants to the animals.

The Cabinet member responsible for public protection, Cllr Gareth Lloyd said: “This was a truly shocking case of neglect that caused terrible suffering to so many animals. We will not hesitate to act decisively whenever we need to protect animal welfare.”

“This was an extreme case, and in no way reflects on the dedication of the overwhelming majority of Ceredigion farmers in maintaining the highest standards of care for their animals.”

Sentencing:
16 weeks’ imprisonment suspended for 12 months. Ordered to pay costs to the council of £1,500 each. Disqualified from keeping any animals of any description for five years. The pair were allowed 28 days in which to make the necessary arrangements.

Cambrian News

Jaywick, Essex: Monshur Alom

#TheList company director Monshur Alom, born 28/11/1981, of 169 Golf Green Road, Jaywick, Clacton-on-Sea CO15 2RL – exposed his Bengal cats to 31 degree heat and left ducks outside without fresh food or water for more than a week

Convicted animal abuser Monshur Alom of Stepney, London, and with links to Jaywick, Essex

Chelmsford magistrates were shown graphic images of the animals’ living conditions during an eight-day period in June 2018, before RSPCA inspectors were able to contact owner Monshur Alom.

Alom, a furniture dealer trading as Royal London Antiques and director of a company named Cheque Bid Ltd, admitted to three breaches of the Animal Welfare Act.

The animals were being kept at the address in Golf Green Road, Jaywick, so the new dad could renovate his other home in Sidney Street, Stepney, London to accommodate the animals and his growing family.

Lauren Bond, prosecuting, called him “clearly unfit” to look after animals.

The ducks, and exotic cats, which he had no licence to keep, are now with the RSPCA.

Ms Bond said: “The inspector was overwhelmed by the heat in the conservatory and the ammonia smell burnt his nose.

“There was blood over the floor as though the cats had dragged raw meat but there was no sign of a carcass. There was a trough of water which was bright green, and large litter trays that appeared very full.

“Outside the ducks were confined to a one metre by three metre alleyway. There was liquid faeces on the floor and it smelt disgusting.”

It was his first time before the court in relation to animal welfare.

Mrs Scoot, mitigating, explained life had got on top of him and he had also been unwell.

Convicted animal abuser Monshur Alom of Stepney, London, and with links to Jaywick, Essex

However, he did accept his actions were a “form of neglect”.

She said: “He’s had the cats for two years and there’s never been any concern or need for the RSPCA to address him or the family.

“Unfortunately, the cats weren’t litter trained so he had them in the property for a short time and renovations were being made to their current property to give them appropriate living conditions.

“He’d had the ducks for significantly less time. A friend was going to kill them so he took the ducks and was going to find another home for them.

“He didn’t plan to keep them long term.”

Sentencing:
180 hours of unpaid work; £685 costs. Banned from keeping animals for ten years.

Southend Standard

Crediton, Devon: Michael Rice

#TheList farmer Michael Rice, born c. 1950, of High View, Woodland Head, Crediton EX17 5HE – kept cattle in appalling conditions; failed to treat very poorly cow.

Officers described the living conditions for the animals throughout the farm as ‘generally poor’, as several animals did not have a dry lying area and had access to sharp objects which posed a risk to their health such as farm machinery and rusty nails.

The case was brought by Devon, Somerset and Torbay Trading Standards Service following an investigation into concerns for the welfare of his cattle.

Trading standards officers and a vet from the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) visited the farm and discovered a bovine which appeared to have been unable to stand for several weeks with no access to water or supplementary feed.

Rice had previously been advised by a vet that if the animal’s health didn’t improve it should be culled. However several weeks later, when trading standards visited his farm, he had made no attempt to do so.

The vet believed that the animal was subjected to ‘avoidable and unnecessary suffering’ under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 both by failure to cull without delay and failure to isolate the sick animal and house it in suitable accommodation with dry comfortable bedding.

District Judge Matson described the conditions on the farm as ‘appalling’ and the condition the bovine was left in as ‘extremely upsetting and distressing’.

Sentencing:
16-week suspended prison sentence, fined £6,970 and banned from keeping animals for 10 years.

Farming UK

Cullompton, Devon: Edward Shere

Edward Shere, born c. 1989, of Gingerland Livery Yard, Colebrooke Lane, Cullompton EX15 1PD – shot a pet pig called Ivor three times before dragging him, still alive, onto a trailer with a winch

Edward Shere
Callous Edward Shere caused pet pig Ivor tremendous suffering in his final moments

Shere, a former stocksman with the Portman Hunt, had denied harming the pig but was found guilty of causing him unnecessary suffering.

RSPCA officials said Shere was contacted on the hunt’s emergency line by Ivor’s owner.

The owner asked Shere to humanely destroy the pet pig at a smallholding. Vets had advised the animal be euthanised.

However, the defendant used an ‘incorrect weapon’ and failed to properly and humanely euthanise Ivor, who weighed 340 kilograms.

Shere then winched the much-loved family pet onto a trailer while he still alive in front of his owners, who had gathered to say their final goodbyes.

Ivor’s owner has since set up a campaign group on Facebook.

RSPCA chief inspector Mike Butcher, who investigated for the animal welfare charity, said: “It’s essential all animals are treated in a way which safeguards their welfare at all times, throughout their entire life.

“Many animals have their lives ended due to being put down as a result of illness, age or infirmity.

“At this upsetting final stage of an animal’s life, owners place their full trust in those employed to humanely put animals to sleep to do so competently and without causing the type of suffering Ivor sadly experienced.”

Sentencing: disqualified for transporting (but not keeping) animals for three years. 120 hours of unpaid work; £750 fine.

Bournemouth Echo

Bridgwater, Somerset: Martin Veysey

#TheList Martin Veysey, born c. 1955, of 6 Albert Court, Albert Street, Bridgwater, Somerset TA6 7ET – breached a previous life ban on keeping animals imposed on him in 2011

Veysey pleaded guilty to six charges under the Animal Welfare Act and the Cattle Identification Regulations on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 at Taunton Crown Court.

Veysey was banned for life from keeping animals in 2011 after he was prosecuted for causing unnecessary suffering and failing to provide appropriate care for his animals.

The latest prosecution was brought by Devon, Somerset and Torbay Trading Standards Service and related to the purchase, transport and ownership of cattle obtained from markets in the South West.

Charges also related to a pony and an American bulldog owned by Veysey.

Veysey was also found guilty for failing to report and record the movements of cattle and failing to surrender the passports of cattle to Defra’s British Cattle Movement Service.

The court heard that the prosecution followed an investigation by Trading Standards officers.

Officers gathered intelligence from several sources including from members of the public, who responded to adverts he had placed to sell animals, as well as the RSPCA, livestock auctioneers and landowners who had witnessed his involvement with animals.

In sentencing Veysey, the judge told him that ‘the legislation is intended to protect animals from cowboys like you’ and warned him any further breaches would mean that he would go to prison.

Sentencing: eight-month prison sentence suspended for two years. Costs of £2,115.

BridgwaterMercury

Tiverton, Devon: William Douglas Dolley

Starved calf

#TheList William Douglas Dolley, born March 1969, of Holwell Farm, Collipriest, Tiverton, Devon EX16 4PT – let a calf starve and left dead sheep in a field

Dolley was caught with piles of bones, dead animals and sick cattle on his farm in Devon twice in 11 months by trading standards inspectors.

He had been due to stand trial over a previous inspection in 2017.

But when a vet and trading standards officer returned to Holwell Farm a on 7 February 2018 they found two dead sheep lying unburied in fields where other animals were grazing.

They also discovered piles of rubbish, old bones and an emaciated black bullock calf lying on its side in a cattle shed with no food or water.

Its condition was so bad that it was killed immediately on the orders of the vet.

Dolley admitted causing unnecessary suffering to the bullock, three charges of failing to dispose of carcasses and one of failing to prevent animals having access to by-products.

Sentencing:
Jailed for 18 weeks. Banned from keeping animals for five years.

BBC News

Camborne, Cornwall: Vivian John Exelby

#TheList farmer Vivian John Exelby, born c.  1943, of Little Borthog, Howe Downs, Camborne TR14 0NF – found guilty of 12 animal welfare charges relating to pigs and poultry

Exelby, who has lived at the same farm his entire life, admitted mistreating pigs and poultry.

Magistrates heard how poultry had access to numerous hazards such as empty plastic sacks, old machinery and collapsed buildings, which had the potential to cause them harm.

Other charges related to broken and bent mesh, corrugated iron and damaged wooden panels; not having a suitable dry lying area; failing to provide them with a suitable diet; unnecessary suffering to a pig; insufficient water supply for pigs; two counts of failing to protect pigs from pain, suffering injury and disease; not having a dry lying area for pigs; housing pigs in isolation; keeping a hen in an unsuitable arc with solid sides, no natural light and damp conditions; failing to protect a pig from a collapsed roof.

Exelby pleaded guilty to all 12 offences, which took place before April 30, 2018.

An order was made under section 34 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 banning him from having any responsibility of all farm animals.

Stuart Benson, from Cornwall Council, said: “It is regrettable that prosecution action had to be taken in this case against an elderly farmer.

“However, despite many attempts over the years to advise him, he has continually failed to provide the most basic of needs to his animals.

“Consequently there was no credible option but to prosecute him.”

Exelby has since sold the remaining livestock he had.

Sentencing:
Four-month electronic monitoring. £1,500 costs and £85 victim surcharge.  Banned from keeping livestock for life.

Farming UK
Falmouth Packet

Lydney, Gloucestershire: Farhad Khalil Ahmed

#TheList Farhad Khalil Ahmed of Lydney, Gloucestershire GL15 – carried out illegal slaughter of a male sheep

Ahmed, owner of Lydney Hand Car Wash, Newerne Street, Lydney GL15 5RF, was convicted under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 with causing unnecessary suffering to a ram.

Ahmed admitted to being filmed cutting a ram’s throat as an accomplice helped him restrain the animal. The video, originally obtained by Caerphilly Trading Standards officers in an unrelated investigation, was passed to Gloucestershire Trading Standards who interviewed Ahmed for offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

Ahmed entered a guilty plea and was convicted of a single offence of causing unnecessary suffering to the ram under Section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

Cllr Dave Norman, cabinet member for public protection said “I would like to congratulate our Trading Standards Animal Health Team for bringing this offender to justice. This animal clearly suffered a horrific death at the hand of this person and his accomplices.”

“Our Trading Standards team work to ensure the strict welfare standards for farm animals are followed at all times.”

Sentencing: 12-month community order with 150 hours of unpaid work. Ordered to pay the full prosecution costs of £1,700 and an £85 victim surcharge.

Punchline Gloucester

Ballymena, County Antrim: Michael Agnew

#TheList Michael Agnew, aged 47, formerly of Ballynease Road,  Portglenone, Ballymena BT44 8NU and now said to be living in Garvagh, County Londonderry  – for causing unnecessary suffering to two pigs

Agnew has 159 previous criminal convictions, 19 of which are for animal welfare offences. He had  previously been banned from keeping livestock in May 2014.

Photograph produced in previous prosecution case against cruel farmer Michael Agnew
Photograph produced in previous prosecution case against cruel farmer Michael Agnew

Prosecution barrister Catherine Chasemore told the court officials from the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) carried out an inspection at Agnew’s farm on 6 October 2015.

She said two sows “were described as being particularly thin.”

One had “a large mammary abscess which had burst and the other had a spinal abscess,” she said.

A DARD vet told Agnew the animals were suffering unnecessarily and the only humane option was to euthanise the sows.

“The defendant strenuously objected to this and insisted that his own vet was called for a second opinion,” the prosecution barrister added.

“This was done and she agreed that the sows be euthanised, which the defendant then agreed to.

“The defendant was invited to be interviewed on two occasions but failed to give an account”, Ms Chasemore said

She told the court Agnew’s previous convictions included failing to dispose of the animal carcasses of three sheep, one donkey, one horse and two cows and allowing live animals to access the carcasses.

On one occasion in December 2012 officials found numerous dead animals on Agnew’s farm, she said.

A defence barrister said Agnew, a father of six children, was terrified of going to jail.

He had separated from his partner and only now only called at the Portglenone farm to collect or drop off his children, the barrister said.

“This was not a case of widespread neglect, it involved two sows. His record in terms of animal welfare is atrocious but this offending did not involve flocks nor herds”, the barrister added.

The lifetime ban prohibits Agnew from ever owning, keeping, transporting or dealing with animals.

Sentencing at Londonderry Crown Court on Tuesday 23/10/2018, Judge Philip Babington said Agnew “should be kept miles away from every living creature.”

“Any animal seeing this man coming over the horizon would have a heart attack,” the judge said.

He said he felt Agnew should go to prison but that it would be detrimental to his children to impose a custodial sentence.

“Your former partner and your children still live on the farm and you want to have contact with your six children.

“But if you every have any have any contact with animals again you will be going straight to prison”, he told Agnew.

Judge Babington also ordered the removal of any animals currently owned by Agnew.

Sentencing:
18 months in prison, suspended for four years. Banned from keeping animals for life.

BBC News

Bradworthy, Devon: Rebecca J Tucker and Luke J Morley

#TheList Rebecca J Tucker, aged 46, of Bradworthy, Devon, and Luke J Morley, aged 37, who’s now moved back to his home town of Leicester – ran a small holding in Bradworthy where horses, cattle and pigs were kept in squalid conditions without food and water

Tucker and Morley, who previously lived together at Boards Court, Bideford,  pleaded guilty to a range of charges under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and the Welfare of Farmed Animals (England) Regulations 2007.

Rebecca Tucker and Luke Morley from Devon pleaded guilty to causing animals to suffer

Trading Standards Officers, Animal and Plant Health Agency vets and RSPCA inspectors were called to the pair’s premises at various times during December 2017 and January 2018 and found animals being kept in poor conditions and a state of neglect.

On one occasion a vet found 14 cattle in a newly built shed with no dry lying or bedding or food. There was also a small area adjacent where pigs were housed, and they had no access to water.

On another day a vet arrived at the farm mid-morning to find the animals had not yet received any attention such as food and water that day.

When Trading Standards Officers visited they found 11 horses in a field with no suitable dry area for them to lie down in and they had no supplementary food.

Rebecca Tucker and Luke Morley from Devon pleaded guilty to causing animals to suffer

There was also a collapsed five bar gate, collapsed fencing and collapsing netting in the field posing dangers of sharp metal edges and nails and an amount of plastic and burnt rubbish in the area.

Some of the horses were in such a bad state, that the pair were found to have caused them “unnecessary suffering” and so the RSPCA took possession of them.

Rebecca Tucker and Luke Morley from Devon pleaded guilty to causing animals to suffer

During the hot sunny period in May vets were concerned about the lack of food, water and adequate shelter for the pigs – sunburn is a significant problem for pigs.

Trading Standards Officers returned to monitor the welfare of the animals and found further issues concerning diet, water and environment and reported their findings and subsequent advice to Tucker and Morley both verbally and in writing.

A further visit in June found eight pigs with a lack of dry bedding and a Belgian blue calf suffering from hair loss, scabs and a significant untreated lice infestation.

Despite repeated advice and intervention, Tucker and Morley made only temporary improvements, if any, in caring for their animals.

At the time of the offences it is understood that Tucker was the owner of the farming business and employed Morley to feed and care for the animals.

The Judge commented that Tucker “shirked responsibility” and put blame of the animals’ state on Morley, even though extensive advice had been provided to both by the inspectors.

Sentencing: 
Tucker – 17 weeks’ imprisonment for each offence to be served concurrently and suspended for 12 months. 180 hours of unpaid community work. Total costs of £390. 

Morley – 12 weeks’ imprisonment for each offence to be served concurrently and suspended for 12 months. 120 hours of unpaid community work. Total costs of £240.

Both – banned from keeping animals for ten years (expires October 2028).

DevonLive
BBC News